Fishing for Brexit.. 23/6/2016 FINALLY LEAVING THE EU - Page 60
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Thread: Fishing for Brexit.. 23/6/2016 FINALLY LEAVING THE EU

  1. #591
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    EU FISH BATTLE Michel Barnier fights EU nation rebellion over fear he’ll grant UK fishing reprieve

    https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/brexit...hing-backstop/

  2. #592
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    Scots Tories Thrown Down Gauntlet to May on Fishing

    https://order-order.com/2018/11/14/s...t-may-fishing/

    Ross Thomson MP

    https://twitter.com/RossThomson_MP/s...21691997167616

  3. #593
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    SFF : Statement on Brexit deal

    https://www.sff.co.uk/statement-brexit-deal/

  4. #594
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    Why I will not vote for Theresa May’s deal – Ross Thomson MP

    https://www.scotsman.com/news/opinio...n-mp-1-4829903

  5. #595
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    Brexit: Scottish fishing industry calls for clarity

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotla...tland-46220208

    Fishing industry unhappy with draft Brexit deal

    https://www.shetnews.co.uk/2018/11/1...t-brexit-deal/

    Industry seeks Brexit clarity from Prime Minister

    https://www.sff.co.uk/industry-seeks...rime-minister/

    NFFO : Withdrawal Agreement

    http://nffo.org.uk/news/withdrawal-agreement.html

  6. #596
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    Draft agreement a first step – with a long way to go

    http://fiskerforum.dk/en/news/b/draf...long-way-to-go

    There are few people who will be scrutinising sections of the draft EU/UK withdrawal agreement as carefully as fishermen’s organisations on both sides of the Channel and the North Sea.

    As could have been expected, there are already loud voices stating that this is an epic betrayal, while others have been more sanguine, and the NFFO has given the draft text its cautious approval, stating that while this is a first step, ‘further challenges lie ahead in securing the actual access arrangements and quota shares consistent with that new status.’

    The text stresses the UK’s new position as a coastal state, but also lays emphasis on the need to co-operate and the need to have a full agreement in place by mid 2020.

    ‘It would be hard to overestimate the seismic significance of this shift,’ the NFFO states.

    ‘The agreement binds the parties to work cooperatively to ensure that fishing remains within sustainable levels. It concedes, however, that under international law, the UK will negotiate as an independent coastal state, with the rights and responsibilities of that new status under UN Law of the Sea.’

    The NFFO states that the EU, in its initial negotiating mandate, made clear that it would seek to make an agreement on a future EU/UK trade deal contingent on maintaining existing access to fish in UK waters and status quo on quota shares.

    ‘The explicit reference to future fisheries negotiations between the UK and EU taking place within the context of the overall economic partnership, signals that this is where the EU will seek to maintain its negotiating leverage, albeit with a much-weakened hand to play,’ an NFFO spokesman said.

    While the NFFO, representing much of the fishing sector south of the border, has extended a cautious welcome to the draft, it’s noticeable that the Scottish Fishermen’s Federation’s immediate reaction has taken a harder line, stating that clarity is already being sought on the proposed new fisheries agreement over concerns about any potential linkage between access for EU vessels to UK waters and tariff-free access for UK seafood suppliers to the EU market.

    For Britain’s Prime Minister to get the agreement through cabinet is a first step, but this remains a very long way from being a done deal, and a concrete deal is still some way off. This draft can be seen as a starting point and a declaration of intent, but with a huge amount of detail still to be worked through – much of it potentially against significant opposition.

    Fishing remains a significant issue, despite the relatively modest size of the fisheries sector – and the UK government with its wafer-thin majority in Parliament has already been given a warning that a handful of votes against the government’s by MPs representing disgruntled fishing communities could bring everything to a crashing halt once Parliament is given a chance to vote on it.

  7. #597
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    SFF reminds Theresa May of commitments to UK fishing

    http://fiskerforum.dk/en/news/b/sff-...-to-uk-fishing

    In the wake of the latest instalment in the Brexit saga, SFF chief executive Bertie Armstrong has reminded British PM Theresa May that commitments have been made to the UK fishing industry.

    ‘We welcome the intervention of the Secretary of State for Scotland and his fellow MPs stating that they could not support anything less than full and effective sovereignty over UK fishing waters,’ he said.

    ‘We have been saying for two years that the only plausible way forward for the industry is for the UK to become an independent coastal state with the power to determine who catches what, where and when in our waters.’

    He reiterated the SFF’s position that any link between access to UK waters for foreign vessels and the trade in seafood between the UK and the EU can not be linked.

    ‘Any linkage between access and trade contravenes all international norms and practice and is simply unacceptable in principle,’ Bertie Armstrong said, commenting that industry leaders are seeking clarity from the Prime Minister on the proposed new fisheries agreement within the Brexit settlement amid concerns about a linkage between access for EU vessels to UK waters and tariff-free access for UK seafood suppliers to the EU market.

    ‘The industry’s priority has always been taking back control of decision-making over who catches what, where and when in our waters. That would mean the UK becoming a fully independent coastal state with its own seat at all the relevant international fisheries negotiations from December 2020. Negotiations over trade terms for seafood products would follow on from this. Therefore we have asked the Prime Minister for assurances that the establishment of a new fisheries agreement as laid out in the Brexit arrangements does not imply that EU vessels will be guaranteed continued access to our waters in return for favourable trade terms,’ he stated.

    ‘The Prime Minister has made a series of commitments to the industry and anything less than the fulfilment of those makes ‘no deal’ a more attractive option.’

    Source: SFF

  8. #598
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    Upset over fish, France leads EU criticism of draft Brexit deal

    https://uk.reuters.com/article/uk-br...-idUKKCN1NK21E

  9. #599
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    Sheryll Murray MP

    https://www.facebook.com/sheryllmurr...485?__tn__=H-R

    Institute for Government spokesperson on BBC has just confirmed access to Fisheries is in the “too difficult” box. Fisheries will be very significant in the future trade arrangements. Here is my take on it.

    History often teaches us lessons that we can learn from as we move forward. In 1971 in response to the UK’s application to join the European Economic Community, the original six member states insisted on equal access to UK fishing waters. The then Conservative Prime Minister Sir Edward Heath agreed, and after more than a decade of negotiations about the share of the fish stock within those waters, the UK accepted a proposed share which fell far short of the quantity we should have benefited from. Indeed, off the Cornish coast the UK share is approximately 10% of Haddock and 8% of Cod whereby the French Government secured around 70% of each stock.

    British fishermen felt that they had been thrown a lifeline when the UK voted to leave the European Union. The felt they could face their future with optimism for the first time in over 40 years. They were also promised by the Prime Minister, Environment Secretary and many senior Cabinet figures that the UK would be leaving the Common Fisheries Policy and that the fish stocks in our waters would be governed by Article 61, 62 and 63 of the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea.

    The wording of this Convention is very important because it makes clear that the UK must act responsibly when setting the total amount of fish that can be taken from our waters (200mile to median line limit). It also makes clear that the UK domestic fleet can take the whole of that fish, but if our fleet cannot, then the surplus can be made available to other nations.

    One would think this means that the UK fleet can benefit considerably from a larger catch after 11pm 29 March 2019. Sadly, this is not the case because of the Prime Minister’s agreement on an implementation period of 21 months. At the time this was first proposed, fishing MPs including myself met with the Prime Minister and said that any implementation for fisheries should only apply until 31 December 2019. The EU would not accept this and the UK Government caved in and agreed that UK fishermen would have to stick to the same share they received under the Common Fisheries Policy of a further 21 months. UK fishermen reluctantly accepted this.

    The Withdrawal Agreement which has now been published contains a proposal that the implementation period can be extended and the UK can only withdraw from the Northern Ireland Backstop with the agreement of the EU. What is the problem with this one could ask?

    On the morning of the 14 November, it was reported that Sabine Weyand, Michele Barnier’s deputy who leads the EU’s negotiations at a technical level said that the UK would be forced to concede on fisheries as part of a withdrawal agreement, meaning Britain would have to "swallow a link between access to products and fisheries in future agreements”. The Prime Minister and Environment Secretary have said repeatedly that they would not use UK fish as a currency to buy into the market. I therefore fear that any future trade negotiations would result in stalemate and we would be tied into the backstop indefinitely, or UK fish stocks would be used to buy into a trade deal with the EU.

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    David Mundell ambushes Theresa May over fishing rights

    https://www.pressandjournal.co.uk/fp...ishing-rights/

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