Fishing for Brexit.. 23/6/2016 FINALLY LEAVING THE EU - Page 31
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Thread: Fishing for Brexit.. 23/6/2016 FINALLY LEAVING THE EU

  1. #301
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    EU shock warning: Ireland 'must call STATE OF EMERGENCY' over Brussels

    https://www.express.co.uk/news/world...austerity-debt

  2. #302
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    Fishermen press Scotland Office minister on Brexit plans

    http://www.shetnews.co.uk/newsbites/...n-brexit-plans

  3. #303
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    Brexit and the Australian Fisheries Management Authority

    http://nffo.org.uk/news/brexit-and-t...authority.html

  4. #304
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    Gove slams EU fisheries policy as 'economically DISASTROUS' as he vows UK will 'do better'

    http://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/861...rty-Conference

  5. #305
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    UK members confirm commitment to EAPO until Brexit dictates otherwise

    http://fiskerforum.dk/en/news/b/uk-m...ates-otherwise

    The European Association of Fish Producers Organisations held its Annual General Meeting (AGM) in Knokke-Heist, Belgium at the end of September, hosted by local member Rederscentrale. The UK’s expected departure from the European Union was one of the key subjects discussed at the meeting.

    Chairmen of some EAPO working groups expressed their regret that Brexit is looming, which could result in a clear loss of momentum in EAPO’s activities. The UK members pointed out that for them it is too soon to think about changes in the European representation, confirming that they intend to remain active members of EAPO until Brexit determines otherwise.

    Within EAPO the subject of Brexit shall be avoided as much as possible until the European Common Market Organisation would no longer affect all current member POs.

    The meeting itself was opened by Patricia De Clercq, deputy head of Flemish minister Joke Schauvliege’s cabinet for agriculture, fisheries and countryside.

    Both Ms. De Clercq and the attending representatives of the Directorate General for Maritime Affairs and Fisheries of the European Commission, emphasised the fact that POs are seen as cornerstones for successfully reaching the objectives of the European Common Fisheries Policy.

    EAPO President Pim Visser reported on the activities of the association, including the current issues, such as the development of multiannual plans and the final phase of the implementation of the Landing Obligation.

    ‘We are extremely afraid of a ‘big bang’ in 2019,’ he reported.

    Representatives of the European Commission attending the meeting positively commented on the work done by EAPO in the Market Advisory Council on the PO’s Production and Marketing Plans and the financing of those plans. They were also looking for EAPO’s input into the intended review of the market standards for fishery products. The third topic was the preparatory work on the new EU multi-annual financial framework as of 2021. EAPO was requested to give a view on the successes and failures of the current framework and to contribute to the upcoming public consultation.

    ‘I consider this a successful General Assembly,’ Pim Visser commented following the meeting.

    ‘Our work over the last year has borne fruit for our members and the way the challenges have to be addressed in the coming year has been agreed. It was my intention to look for an interim optimal structure that suits best the fishermen represented by our members. The direct needs and interests of these fishermen, going out to sea week in week out, must be the main driver for our dedicated working group to come up with a well-documented proposal on the future of best possible fisheries representation in Europe.’

    Source: EAPO

  6. #306
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    Make them PAY! French fisherman could face charges to sail in British waters after Brexit

    http://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/864...sheries-policy

  7. #307
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    Strong public support for control of fisheries post-Brexit

    http://www.sff.co.uk/strong-public-s...s-post-brexit/

  8. #308
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    Fears UK fishing industry losing out on £230 million and 2,700 jobs, ITV News learns

    http://www.itv.com/news/2017-10-20/f...v-news-learns/

  9. #309
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    Brexit comes to Lorient

    http://fiskerforum.dk/en/news/b/brexit-comes-to-lorient


    Speakers at the Itech'Mer Brexit round table

    Gérard Romiti and Alain Cadec

    Gaël le Saout, Javier Touza for Bluefish and Gerard van Balsfoort

    Jim Portus and Gaël le Saout

    ‘You’re a brave man, James,’ said Gérard Romiti, president of France’s CNPMEM fishermen’s organisation, speaking to SWFPO chief executive Jim Portus at a Brexit round table held in Lorient during last week’s Itech’Mer exhibition.

    The discussion chaired by Nicolas Teisseire was between Alain Cadec, who chairs the European Parliament’s Committee on Fisheries, Gérard Romiti of CNPMEM, Jim Portus, Brittany, regional councillor Gaël le Saout, Javier Touza for Bluefish and Gerard van Balsfoort representing the European Fisheries Alliance.

    Jim Portus made plain the UK industry’s point of view, while Alain Cadec made it plain that his role is to defend the interests of European fishermen as a number of angles of the UK’s expected departure from the CFP were talked through, with clear differences of opinion – notably on the UK determination to treat fishing access and market access as separate issues, while the European position is that the two are closely linked and must be treated as such.

    The point was made that currently nine member states that take 42% of the volume caught in British waters, while UK fishermen take 22% of their catches in community waters and the UK exports 65% of its landings to Europe

    ‘Any politician would look at these figures, 42%, 22% and 65%, and say there’s a compromise to be reached here,’ Gerard van Balsfoort said, adding that this event was the first time that the industry has discussed the implications of Brexit, even though there is so much communication and co-operation in other fields.

    While there are clear differences of opinion there, if there was one point that every speaker could agree on, it was that fishing must not become a pawn in wider negotiations.

    ‘It is vital that fishing should be part of an exit agreement. If we have to deal with this later, it will be much worse,’ Gerard van Balsfoort said. ‘If there’s a trade deal and fishing has to be dealt with afterwards, we will have total uncertainty.’

    ‘I agree that fishing has to be part of the package as a whole,’ Alain Cadec said. ‘I’m trying to be optimistic, but I’m worried.’

    Look out for the full report in Hook & Net later this week.

    Source: H&N

  10. #310
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    Fishing must be a priority in Brexit talks, say European fishing communities

    http://fiskerforum.dk/en/news/b/fish...ng-communities

    Representatives of European fishing communities came together this week, sending a strong message to the European Council, the European Commission, and the European Parliament, calling on these institutions to make fisheries a priority in the Brexit negotiations and to safeguard the economic and social future of European fishing and coastal communities.

    The meeting took place at Santiago de Compostela as fishing communities set to be most affected by the UK’s withdrawal from the EU and the CFP came together to make a joint statement.

    ‘The economic prosperity of coastal communities in European regions and countries bordering the Atlantic and the North Sea is closely linked to our relationship with the United Kingdom,’ they state.

    ‘We have shared resources and fishing grounds with our British colleagues. We note with concern that the planned departure of the United Kingdom from the European Union has created considerable uncertainty for the fisheries sector and for the coastal communities that the sector supports. These are communities that – for the most part – are already facing significant homegrown socio-economic challenges, independent of Brexit, such as maintaining sustainable employment and avoiding depopulation.’

    The partners also note with concern that many British policymakers and fisheries professionals have signalled their intention to move away from a fisheries management model based on co-operation and from the acknowledgment of their economic interdependence.

    ‘Many appear to see Brexit as an opportunity to exclude European fishermen from their traditional fishing grounds. Continued access to those waters is of fundamental importance for the survival and continued prosperity of our coastal communities,’ a spokesman said.

    ‘We also note with concern that many in the UK see Brexit as an opportunity to unilaterally alter the distribution of catch quota; a distribution arrangement that has allowed our economic prosperity and has been the basis for sustainable management of our shared fish stocks.’

    ‘We call upon European decision-makers to take into account the challenges faced by coastal communities in Europe. We call upon them to uphold the principle of reciprocity in trade relationships so as to make access to European markets for British seafood products conditional on access to fishing grounds for our fleets.’

    The joint statement sets out that European decision-makers need to work to support fishing communities all across Europe by upholding shared values.

    ‘We ask these decision makers to aim for an agreement that will guarantee long-term economic prosperity for our communities and sustainable management of fish stocks.’

    ‘European fishing communities will be the first to experience the new relationship between the United Kingdom and the European Union. The future social and economic prosperity of our communities – and the fishing industry – will depend on European policymakers approaching the issue rationally, sensibly and with an understanding of the shared history of European fisheries in mind.’

    ‘We stand here today, united in a common purpose to ensure that fisheries is a priority in the Brexit negotiations and to safeguard the social and economic future of our fishing communities and fishing industry.’

    Source: EUFA

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