Brexit 23/6/2016 FINALLY LEAVING THE EU 11pm 31/1/2020 - Page 6
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Thread: Brexit 23/6/2016 FINALLY LEAVING THE EU 11pm 31/1/2020

  1. #51
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    Scots fishermen warn they must not be "expendable" in any post-Brexit deal

    http://www.heraldscotland.com/news/1...t_Brexit_deal/

  2. #52
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    Brexit will right historic injustices – NFFO

    http://www.fishupdate.com/brexit-wil...justices-nffo/

  3. #53
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    Negotiations could sideline fishing

    http://fiskerforum.dk/en/news/b/nego...deline-fishing

    Olivier Lepretre, president of the Nord Pas-de-Calais fisheries committee, hopes that the European Commission has heard the very clear message sent by the UK Brexit vote.

    He is one of three Boulogne owners with newbuilds on the way from the Padmos yard, and is understandably nervous about the future prospects for access to the UK side of the Channel, commenting that if he had suspected which way the referendum might go, the new boat would not have been ordered.

    ‘There will have to be negotiations between the UK and the EU Commission,’ he said in an interview with Hook and Net, commenting that there is real concern that fishing will be sidelined as negotiations focus on other maritime sectors.

    ‘We have more interest in UK waters that the English fishermen have in ours and 80% of my fishing activity is on the UK side. If we lose those grounds, then French fishermen will be squeezed into a smaller area where there will be conflicts and increased fishing effort. Now we can fish up to the English six-mile limit, and we don’t know what will happen now – if we go back to what we had before 1983. This will have to be renegotiated. We’ll have to negotiate as Europe does with Iceland and Norway, with the UK as a third country and we will have to reach new agreements on shared stocks.’

    ‘For French, Dutch and Spanish fishing, this could be catastrophic,’ Olivier Lepretre said. ‘Spain stands to make the heaviest loss. I’m convinced that British fisherman will find themselves disadvantaged – and Britain seems to be keeping the disadvantages, such as the discard ban. We expect that the UK will lose its place on the Advisory Councils. They’ll be invited to attend, but British fishermen won’t have a voice. It’s not a great way to defend the rights of UK fishermen, and as a fisherman, that’s not what I want to see.’

    Source: Hook and Net

  4. #54
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    SFF submits two Papers to the EERC

    http://www.sff.co.uk/papers-submitted-eerc/

  5. #55
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    Scottish fishermen support Brexit,shun Sturgeon’s call for independence

    https://www.rt.com/uk/353569-scotlan...exit-sturgeon/

  6. #56
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    Scotland's fishing sector could be world leaders post-Brexit, MSPs told

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotlan...itics-36903837

    Scotland's fishing industry would be "unleashed" after Brexit allowing it to show "world leadership", MSPs at Holyrood have been told.

    Bertie Armstrong, of the Scottish Fishermen's Federation, outlined the view during a meeting of the European and External Relations Committee.

    His evidence was given along with 10 other financial and business experts.

    Alastair Sim, of Universities Scotland, expressed concerns for the education sector once the UK leaves the EU.

    Look back at what experts and business leaders told the committee

    The Scottish Parliament committee held its special summer session following the 23 June referendum which resulted in the UK voting by 52% to 48% to end its membership of the European Union.

    The electorate in Scotland voted by 62% to 38% to remain.

    Mr Armstrong and Mr Sim were joined by;

    Clare Slipper, parliamentary officer, National Farmers Union Scotland
    David Frost, chief executive, Scotch Whisky Association
    Gordon Dewar, chief executive, Edinburgh Airport
    Hugh Chater, director of Banking, Virgin Money
    James Withers representing Scotland's food and drink sector

    The committee also heard from Graeme Roy, director of the Fraser of Allander Institute; Colin Borland, from the Federation of Small Business Scotland, and Kenny Richmond, of Scottish Enterprise.

    Scotland's fishing industry was a vocal backer of Brexit and Mr Armstrong made it clear to the committee that there would be opportunities for his sector.

    He said: "One of the benefits that will exist is at last we can stop focusing on a bizarrely bureaucratic process and start focusing on outcome, which in our case would be fishing opportunity. That would be no small change."
    'Whacking great opportunity'

    However, Mr Armstrong said he was worried that because fishing accounted for less that a 0.5% of GDP it would be used as a "bargaining chip" in negotiations.

    He explained: "The Belgian fleet, the Netherlands fleet, the Danish fleet has got very used to catching almost all of their fish in our EEZ [Exclusive Economic Zone] over a period of 40 years.

    "They will therefore use that in negotiation. Of course as a matter of observation and the bit that slightly frightens us is that we have got used to this unusual depressed, deprived, position we are now in that we shouldn't be in if we had the managing partner status in our EEZ."

    Mr Armstrong detailed what he saw as future opportunities by saying: "And I emphasise again - this is Scottish jobs, this is increasing our economic activity in areas that really need it and a potential for world leadership, and I don't think that is an over emphasis - this is a whacking great opportunity for Scotland."

    The education sector has voiced concerns over the Brexit vote and Mr Sim told the committee that the "important thing" now was getting the outcome "right".

    He said: "It is vastly important that whatever future relationship we craft with the European Union it is one that maintains the movement of talent and the movement of ideas across boundaries.

    "There is a process that needs to be in train to set out our negotiating objectives that will maintain that as best as possible.

    "For the moment we rely on the continuing benefits of our continuing membership of the European Union which is incredibly important for European students and European researchers.

    "But we do need to be moving into a phase where we need to actually start to understand whether the UK government is setting priorities for the future relationship with the EU that will support our further success."
    Scottish exports to the EU

    The Scottish Parliament's information centre put together a briefing on the implications for Scotland of the UK's decision to leave the EU.

    It was published as part of the meeting papers.

    It underlined that Scottish exports to the EU were worth £11.56bn in 2014, and had been growing since 2005. However, they have been falling as a proportion of total exports, now making up 42% of total international exports.

    It also added that the 4,600 business sites in Scotland owned from elsewhere in the EU add £15.8bn to the Scottish economy each year, with Scotland having the highest percentage of Gross Value Added from European-owned countries of any region of the UK.

    Ahead of the committee meeting, the Fraser of Allander Institute published its early thoughts on Brexit.

    It said a prolonged period of "economic uncertainty and financial volatility" was unavoidable.

    It warned this would carry risks for investment, household incomes and jobs.

    The institute has revised down growth forecasts it made before the EU vote.

    It now expects growth of just 0.9% in 2016 (down by 0.5%), 0.5% in 2017 (down by 1.4%), and 0.7% in 2018 (down by 1.3%).

    Its report said that while growth was likely to remain positive on an annual basis, a short "technical recession" - two consecutive quarters of falling output - was "highly possible" within the next three years.

  7. #57
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    Brexit’s effects on Swedish fisheries

    http://fiskerforum.dk/en/news/b/brex...dish-fisheries


    A leading article in Yrkesfiskarna, the magazine of the Swedish Fishermen’s Federation, examines the effects that the UK vote to leave the European Union could have, not least that with the UK separated from the EU, there will be additional negotiations every year on top of the usual Brussels negotiations.

    ‘There will be an additional round of negotiations with Great Britain (or England, depending on what the Scots choose) and it will take a long time and requires effort, which in turn means a heavier burden, both for producer organisations with multiple departments,’ states Yrkesfiskarna.

    ‘We face a gigantic effort to negotiate detach Britain from the EU. In this context, we need to be prepared.’

    According to the Swedish Fishermen’s Organisation, it is important that Sweden is not left out, as can be the case when new agreements are negotiated.

    ‘Denmark is currently establishing a working group with participants from both demersal and pelagic fisheries, which examine the consequences Brexit could have for their business. We should do something similar in Sweden, politicians and business representatives should come together and work together to mitigate the negative consequences of a British withdrawal from the EU.’

    Yrkesfiskarna points out that large areas of the North Sea could be lost to Swedish fishermen if negotiations are unsuccessful, and markets could also be adversely affected as the UK is an important trading partner for Sweden.

    ‘There is much that can be said about the EU and its implemented policies implemented that have failed to achieve what was intended. Fisheries policy is such a failure area, with far too detailed regulation and too little regional consideration.’
    ‘The solution to this is not to leave a union, which largely does a great deal of good. The solution is instead to improve, based on the experience gained. This is currently happening in the EU's common fisheries policy. A new technical regulation is coming. There is a move away from micro-management to a more results-based management, where there is more trust and responsibility placed on the individual fisherman. This is positive!
    We also see that power is moved closer to those affected. This is achieved through the ongoing regionalisation process, with responsibility moved from Brussels to regional councils.This is also positive!’ Yrkesfiskarna states.
    ‘Now we have ahead of us a time of great uncertainty with more questions than answers. It is now important to keep sight of what is important and try to influence outcomes and work to minimise the resulting negative consequences.’

    Source: Yrkesfiskarna

  8. #58
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    Government must work “constructively” with North Sea fishermen after Brexit vote

    https://www.pressandjournal.co.uk/fp...n-brexit-vote/

  9. #59
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    Uncharted territory

    http://fiskerforum.dk/en/news/b/uncharted-territory

    The UK referendum and the vote to part company with the EU is likely to have massive implications for both UK and European fishing business, according to Dutch PO VisNed.

    ‘The implications for fisheries policy, Natura 2000, MCZs, SACs and access to fish are huge,’ said Pim Visser of VisNed, commenting in Hook and Net. He and the PO’s executive secretary Geert Meun are very aware that the main North Sea fishing grounds are on the UK side, while markets are on the European side.

    ‘Fisheries policy is extremely complex and there are many uncertainties,’ Geert Meun said. ‘There is no worse thing for business than uncertainty.’

    ‘A major concern for us is that fishing could become expandable on both sides, and we’re concerned that fishing could become a pawn for both the UK and the EU in future negotiations, which is going to be bad for both British and European fishermen. We have to ensure that fishing doesn’t become a bargaining chip,’ he said.

    A deeper consideration is the future of the Dutch-owned, UK registered fleet of mainly beam trawlers that operates alongside the Dutch fleet, and Pim Visser stressed that these are flag operations, but everything about the way they were acquired and are run is legal.

    ‘These are genuine businesses,’ Geert Meun said. ‘Real businesses run by genuine entrepreneurs who paid high prices for these vessels and built on that. They were bought legally by Dutch buyers from UK vendors and now they feel that their position is uncertain.’

    ‘We’re into uncharted territory and there are no simple answers,’ Pim Visser said.

    Source: Hook and Net

  10. #60
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    Brexit will be big issue at seafood summit

    http://www.fishupdate.com/brexit-wil...eafood-summit/

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