The Real Fish Fight - Support Our Fishing Communities - Page 59
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Thread: The Real Fish Fight - Support Our Fishing Communities

  1. #581
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    http://www.fishnewseu.com/scottish-n...-holyrood.html

    Fisheries debate heats up in Holyrood

  2. #582
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  3. #583
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    It's a shame us under 10's don't the same increases as the big boys. Here on yorkshires coast we've got 200 kilo a MONTH of cod quota for December,which considering it's our main target species beggers belief.

  4. #584
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  5. #585
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    Warning the next "story" is so full of green bullshit you may need toilet roll to clean the crap off your monitor after reading it, Davie

    Global fishing catch significantly under-reported, says study

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-35347446

    The amount of fish taken from the world's oceans over the last 60 years has been underestimated by more than 50%, according to a new study.

    Researchers say that official estimates are missing crucial data on small scale fisheries, illegal fishing and discarded by-catch.

    The authors argue that global fishing catches are now declining rapidly because stocks have been exhausted.

    But other researchers have questioned the reliability of the new study.

    The UN's Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) is the body that collates global statistics on fishing from countries all over the world.

    It was never really sustainable, we went through one stock after the other..
    Prof Daniel Pauly, University of British Columbia

    According to their official figures, the amount of fish caught has increased steadily since 1950 and peaked at 86 million tonnes in 1996 before declining slightly to around 77 million tonnes in 2010.

    But researchers from the University of British Columbia argue that the official figures drastically under-report the true scale of fishing.

    They argue that the figures submitted to the FAO are mainly from large scale "industrial" fishing activities and do not include small scale commercial fisheries, subsistence fisheries as well as the discarded by-catch and estimates for illegal fishing.

    The scientists say their "catch reconstruction" method give a far more accurate picture of the scale of the impacts of fishing around the world.

    They say that reconstructed catches, that include estimates and data on the under-reported activities, show that the world took 53% more fish from the seas than the official figures indicate.

    They argue that around 32 million tonnes of fish go unreported every year - more than the weight of the entire US population.

    "The catches are all underestimated," said lead author Prof Daniel Pauly.

    "The FAO doesn't have a mandate to correct the data that they get - and the countries have the bad habit of reporting only what they see - if they don't have people who report on a given fishery then nothing is reported. The result of this is a systematic underestimation of the catch and this can be very high, 200-300% especially in small island states, in the developed world it can be 20-30%."

    Prof Pauly gave the Bahamas as an example where there was no reporting of fish caught by small scale fishers. But when the researchers dug a little deeper and went to the big hotels and resorts, they found invoices from small scale fishermen who sold their catch directly.

    Not only have more fish been taken from the seas than have been reported say the authors, but the decline in fish caught since the mid 1990s has been far greater than the official figures show.

    The researchers say this isn't because the world is doing less fishing, it's because over exploitation means there are simply less fish being caught.

    "It was never really sustainable," said Prof Pauly.

    "We went through one stock after the other, for example around the British Isles, the stocks in the North Sea were diminished right after the Second World War.

    "And then British trawlers went to Iceland and did the same thing there, and so on and so did the Germans, the Americans, so did the Soviets.

    "They had to expand to survive and now the fisheries are in Antarctica."

    While other scientists in this field have praised the comprehensive nature of the study, some have criticised the methods used.

    "I think we all agree that global catches are probably higher than reported but I do not think that this new catch reconstruction is sufficiently reliable to draw conclusions concerning trends in catches or global fisheries," said Dr Keith Brander, an expert of on fisheries and marine ecosystems who is now an emeritus scientist at the Technical University of Denmark.

    "It may point to particular regions and fisheries sectors that require substantial improvement in statistics in order to improve fisheries management, but to do this one really needs to get into the fine detail," he told BBC News.

    The authors say that they have every confidence in their work. They say they are not based on a handful of studies but on around 200 research papers conducted over a decade by a network of 400 scientists based all over the world.

    While praising the "huge and impressive amount of work" that went into the study, Prof Trevor Branch from the University of Washington said that the report raises another important question that still remains unanswered.

    "Catches only tell us what we take out, not what the status of the remaining fish is," he said.

    "So it's like trying to measure deforestation from counts of trucks of lumber driving away from forests."

    The study has been published in the journal, Nature Communications.

  6. #586
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    Fishing body accuses think-tank of “pulling the wool over people’s eyes”

    https://www.pressandjournal.co.uk/fp...-peoples-eyes/

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  8. #588
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    Haddock everywhere

    http://www.fiskerforum.dk/en/news/b/haddock-everywhere

    The abundance of haddock off the south-west of England and the shortage of quota are causing huge difficulties for fishermen across the region who are forced to dump fish they are not able to avoid catching.

    ‘Haddock isn’t the only problem,’ said Roger Nowell of Newlyn trawler Imogen III. ‘We’re throwing back small-eyed ray and common skate, as well as small amounts of bass that are going over the side dead.’

    He reported that for the last trip they discarded more fish than the boat landed, losing more half of the potential value of the trip.

    ‘I’ve told DEFRA about the volume of haddocks we’re dumping at the moment, so they know about this. The fact that the discard ban isn’t yet enforced here for haddocks indicates there’s space for some common sense to prevail. I reckon to meet the amounts of fish out there would mean increasing the quota 400-500%, just to allow us to continue fishing,’ he said.

    ‘Fishing effort here is nowhere near what it used to be. There are nine trawlers fishing from Newlyn and four of those are under 10m, and there are a dozen or so beamers left. Twenty years ago there were 45 trawlers and four times as many beam trawlers. Effort has been slashed so much, you’d have thought we’d deserve some recognition for what has been done and for how much the fleet has been decimated.’
    ‘Fish stocks are very healthy and definitely not overfished. The idea of overfishing here is a million miles away from the reality.”

    Roger Nowell said that in the twenty years since he left beam trawling and switched to fishing from his own smaller stern trawler, the state of fish stocks is easily as good as it has ever been.

    ‘We’re getting skate off the Wolf Rock now, when we used to have to go all the way to the Bishop Rock before to see skate. As well as skate, spurdogs are a massive menace now and they seem to be everywhere we go,’ Roger Nowell said.

    ‘There will be bankruptcies in this village and people like me will have their boats tied up if this doesn’t change. We’re all hoping that there’s some common sense somewhere to address this, which would also give people a chance to re-invest in business and draw in youngsters to an industry where they don’t see a future at the moment.’

    Source: Fiskerforum

  9. #589
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    EMFF looking positive

    http://www.fiskerforum.dk/en/news/b/...oking-positive

    The recently-announced European Maritime and Fisheries Fund (EMFF) looks positive, according to Chris Ranford at Seafood Cornwall Training in Newlyn. Although nothing has yet been approved, the prospects looks good.

    He said that some categories are able to attract funding of up to 80%, compared to the 60% offered under the old EFF scheme that ended last year.

    ‘There’s a lot that can be done around health and safety, improving quality and improving conditions and funding is 80% for small-scale coastal vessels using static gear. There’s also funding available for boats using towed gear, but at a lesser rate,’ he said.

    ‘We can apply for labour-saving devices such as haulers, for improvements to accommodation, safety equipment. You could practically do a complete refit apart from the main engine.’

    Online applications have been streamlined and simplified, with an interface that adjust itself as the process goes on, removing irrelevant sections. There is also an option to register an expression of interest without needing to go into significant detail

    ‘That’s something we can do in half an hour,’ he said. ‘We are here to help and under EFF I was employed by the FLAG to support applications,” he said, adding that he is known throughout Cornwall as ‘the guy who helps with the funding.’

    “It’s no problem to spend half an hour checking through someone’s application and there’s no cost for that, but if it’s a full application from scratch that takes half a day then there has to be a fee for that, although it’s negotiable,’ he said, adding that a new FLAG application is also in progress for a Cornwall and Isles of Scilly FLAG that could provide routes to tap into further European funds.

    Source: Fiskerforum

  10. #590
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    Time to discard top-down regulation of Scotland’s fishing

    http://www.scotsman.com/news/time-to...hing-1-4075346

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