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  1. #501
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    Scottish Government Consultations
    Beginning this week

    Allocation of fish quotas

    Start date 27/06/2014 - End date 17/10/2014

    This consultation is about the allocation of fish quotas available to the Scottish Government through the EU's Common Fisheries Policy.

    Allocation of fish quotas

    This consultation is about the allocation of fish quotas available to the Scottish Government through the EU's Common Fisheries Policy.
    Contact: John Robb
    Address: Area 1B (South)
    Email:john.robb@scotland.gsi.gov.uk
    Telephone: 0131 244 6436

  2. #502
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    Never has there been a true saying as"don't believe all you read in the paper" well with this article in the Guardian today this saying is very true
    Maybe the Guardian who printed this story can tell UK fishermen what fuel subsidies we all receive and provide evidence to back up the claim that we do
    And as for Global Ocean Commission they wrote the story another Anti Fishing NGO group that's funded by PEW
    Its about time these NGO,s were taken to court for there outlandish claims and lies....John Clark ( Reliance II BF800 )

    http://www.theguardian.com/environme...-the-high-seas


    Fuel subsidies 'drive fishing industry's plunder of the high seas'

    Spain, France, UK, US and Japan among countries giving generous fuel subsidies enabling industrial fishing far offshore, says Global Ocean Commission


    Eighteen countries are underwriting the “plunder of the high seas” on an industrial scale through government hand-outs to fishing fleets, an international commission has found.

    The hand-outs, in the form of fuel subsidies, have enabled fleets to strip the high seas of tuna and other fish stocks, and threaten global food security, the commission said in a report to be released on Tuesday.

    The report from the Global Ocean Commission will urge governments to phase out fuel subsidies over the next five years to give stocks time to recover.

    It will also call on governments to crack down on illegal fishing, and discourage use of plastics to curb ocean pollution.

    “We should end subsidies for high seas fishing,” David Miliband, the former UK foreign secretary and co-chair of the commission, told The Guardian. “When it comes to subsidies for industrial-scale resource extraction, like industrial fishing on the high seas, we are doing a huge disservice to future generations.”

    The commission, made up of former leaders such as Miliband, the former Costa Rican president, José María Figueres, and the former South African finance minister, Trevor Manuel, will also urge the United Nations to adopt ocean protection as a goal when that body meets in September.

    Barack Obama said last week he planned to create the world's largest marine reserve in the south-central Pacific to protect coral reefs, whales, and countless fish species. Obama also pledged to crack down on pirate fishing fleets, and seafood fraud in American grocery chains.

    The commission is focused further offshore: on the high seas, the 65% of the ocean surface that is beyond national boundaries.

    “This was virgin territory 35 or 40 years ago,” said David Miliband. “The technological changes combined with subsidies and the demand from a growing population has turned what had for millennia been virgin territory into plundered territory.”

    He said the high seas amounted to the world's biggest “failed state”.

    The commission said in its report that industrial-scale fleets dominated the high seas, crowding out smaller operations from developing countries and fishing at an unsustainable pace – enabled by generous fuel subsidies.

    The Spanish government led the world with those subsidies, providing some $1073 million in fuel subsidies for a catch of $2625 million, the report found. But France, Britain, Denmark and Italy were also heavily subsidising fuel costs for their fishing fleets.

    Japan, South Korea, and the Phillipines also under-wrote fuel costs for their fleets on the high seas, as did the United States. American subsidies amounted to $137 million on a catch worth $368 million.

    http://cf.datawrapper.de/leuwa/2/?fs=1

    Some 87% of the fish species on the high seas were now over-fished or at the point of collapse, the report said. “The new data we are publishing shows that if it wasn't for subsidies high seas fishing wouldn't be profitable,” Miliband said. “It is effectively the industrialised world that is granting the biggest subsidies and getting the most out of the high seas subsidies.”

    The other big threat to the high seas was from illegal fishing, and the report urged governments to track fishing boats through vessel numbers, as is the practice for other maritime traffic. It also urged governments to ban trans-shipment of catch at sea, a measure that would make it aid traceability of seafood.

    The report said governments should cap and eventually phase out fuel subsidies over five years. If oceans continue to decline governments should consider banning industrial fishing on the high seas entirely, the report said.

    Government should also put into place protections from oil and gas drilling, the report said.

    Campaigners said they hoped the roster of former high-level officials on the commission would have the clout and connections to push governments into action. John Podesta, an advisor to Obama, was a member of the commission until his appointment earlier this year.

    The findings were endorsed by the Oceana conservation group which said fuel subsidies were unfair to the fishing fleets from smaller countries. “A lot of these boats wouldn't be economic without the big subsidies that a lot of countries give to get them way in the middle of the ocean,” said Courtney Sakai, chief of staff for Oceana.

    This is yet another "report" put out by a group fully backed by PEW/Greenpeace and contains a load of total and utter drivel and lies , its long past time that liars like this and especially papers like the Guardian who print them all the time were taken to court and forced to put up or shut up , we ALL know they have NO proof beyond the insane ramblings of green NGO's , Davie

  3. #503
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    http://www.fishnewseu.com/scottish-n...-launched.html

    Quota consultation launched

    THE Scottish Government is currently holding a consultation, after fishermen raised concerns about the present system of quota allocation, which is based on fixed allocations to individual fishing licences.

    Some feel the present system is not providing enough support to active fishermen or to family and smaller local catching businesses. The Government is therefore looking at what improvements can be made to the current system, which has been in place since 1999, to make it easier for new entrants to get into the industry.

    This consultation will look at the current system and what, if any, improvements can be made to it to ensure it pursues the Government's aims.

    The Government's aims are to:
    •Ensure that Scottish fishing communities retain their fishing rights, now and in the future, and that fishing rights remain a Scottish national asset.
    •Promote a shared approach where all concerned are involved in managing Scottish quotas.
    •Encourage quotas to be held by those who can fish them, and to prevent them from becoming a speculative asset. We want to see a thriving fishing industry where new fishermen can get a start, enjoy a share in the profits they toil for and in time establish their own businesses.
    •Provide a stable regulatory environment for the Scottish fishing fleet, for those investing in its future, and for fishing communities.
    •Encourage the growth of businesses and the regeneration of the fleet, and to keep down the cost of quotas.

    Launching the consultation, Scottish Fisheries Secretary Richard Lochhead said: "Throughout the last year, my officials and I held many meetings the length and breadth of Scotland with hundreds of skippers and a big issue that fishermen wanted to discuss is how we can better allocate and manage our fish quota. It should concern us all when fishermen claim more money to be made by acquiring and leasing out quota than there is in actually catching and selling fish.

    "We all want to see a thriving industry where new fishermen can get a start, enjoy a share in the profits they toil for and in time establish their own businesses or join in partnerships through which they can build further success. It is my strongly held conviction that, given their relative scarcity, quotas must be managed in the common interest, and in a way that better provides active fishermen with the access to quota that they need, both now and in the future.

    "This consultation will give everyone with an interest an opportunity to have an informed and rounded debate. I know a lot of folk have made significant investments in quota, on which their livelihoods now depend, and any reform to the system would have to take their interests into account in a carefully considered manner. This consultation will provide the information needed to understand whether we keep the current system, amend the current system, or whether we look to develop a new system.

    "I want to see if we can respond to fishermen's pleas by making sure they get better access to quota or at least are in a system that allows them to lease it at a reasonable cost. That's why I have brought forward this consultation process on the management of fish quotas in Scotland."

  4. #504
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    http://www.fishnewseu.com/scottish-n...increases.html

    Scots hopeful of quota increases

    SCOTTISH fishermen can expect higher quotas to be set next year for haddock, plaice and North Sea nephrops, following a scientific assessment published today.

    The annual publication by the International Council for the Exploration of the Seas (ICES) – an international network of marine and fisheries scientists – helps to inform the fisheries negotiations that take place in the autumn and decide how much quota our fishermen will receive in the coming year.

    For other stocks such as cod, whiting, saithe and herring, catches will remain at current levels and potentially decrease in line with management plans.

    This is first release of ICES advice covering some of the main stocks of interest to Scotland. The next release will be in the early autumn. This year that advice will include mackerel, blue whiting, Atlanto Scandian herring, and also anglerfish and west coast nephrops.

    Responding to these assessments, Scottish Fisheries Secretary, Richard Lochhead, said: "As usual, this scientific advice shows a mixed picture. I am greatly encouraged by the prospects for increased catches in 2015 for North Sea haddock and nephrops, particularly after the cuts sustained this year. These are two of the most valuable stocks for our fleet and this will be very welcome news for our fishermen. I am also encouraged to see that for most of the stocks of interest to Scotland, they are being fished according to the science and I would like to thank our fishermen for the contribution they continue to make to sustainable fisheries.

    "For North Sea cod, although numbers continue to increase, progress is slower. However, at a more local level in different parts of the North Sea, the science confirms what our fishermen have been telling me – that there are hotspots of abundance and these don't align with the quota available. This can create a real headache for our fishermen who struggle to avoid catching cod even when they are targeting other fish, yet are forced to discard it because they cannot get enough quota. With the discard ban fast approaching, we must work with Europe to find a solution to this problem.

    "Publication of this science marks the start of the annual cycle of negotiating our fleet's fishing opportunities for the coming year. My officials and I will continue to work closely with all parts of the fishing industry over the summer to explain the science in detail and to hear what impact these new assessments will have for them. This will help to shape our priorities we will take into the autumn's talks to secure the best outcome possible for Scotland."

  5. #505
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    http://www.fishnewseu.com/scottish-n...ce-agenda.html

    Fishing on independence agenda

    NORTH East MSP Christian Allard is calling on people from every generation of the fishing industry to ensure that fishing is a priority in the independence debate.

    Mr Allard highlighted the important role that fishing has, not only in coastal communities, but also for the whole of Scotland and asked everyone working in and around the industry to get involved in the debate.

    The SNP MSP said that fishermen, onshore processors, seafood haulage and other related suppliers and retailers make up a diverse and wealthy industry that has a wider impact felt well beyond our coastal communities. He also pointed out that new generations coming into the industry have a fantastic opportunity to help the industry flourish thanks to important work being done by the fishing industry and the Scottish Government today.

    Mr Allard's comments come after the European Commission announced that Scottish inshore fishing vessels will no longer be subject to European time at sea limits following a request by the Scottish Government.

    Mr Allard said: "Scottish fishing is vital to coastal communities and Scotland as a whole. Fishermen, processors, seafood haulage and related suppliers make a fantastic contribution to the economy throughout the country.

    "The good news is, there are plenty more fish in the sea – literally. With the discard ban being enforced and more time at sea for Scottish vessels there is a clear opportunity for future generations to benefit from a flourishing fishing industry in the years to come.

    "That is why it is so important that people in the fishing industry - from every generation and from every part of the industry – make their voice heard in the independence debate.

    "I invite people within the industry who share my vision for Scottish fishing after a Yes vote to join me and to ensure that fishing will always be a priority when debating Scotland's future."

  6. #506
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    http://www.fishnewseu.com/44-latest-...ay-stable.html

    Fleet profits stay stable

    THE operating profit margin for the overall UK fishing fleet increased slightly, from 18% to 19%, between 2011 and 2012.

    Net profit margins also increased from 11% to 12% during the same period, according to the latest economic figures from Seafish.

    The latest UK fleet analysis suggests that the economic performance of the industry has remained stable, despite challenging economic conditions and the effects of bad weather, which limited average days at sea in both years.

    The release of the latest survey data comes as Seafish calls for participation in the next fleet survey, which will be published in 2015, with an added focus on the Landings Obligation and its possible implications.

    Researchers will be visiting ports across the UK over the coming weeks to speak to vessel owners and skippers from all sectors of the industry in order to collect data on fishing and vessel costs.

    According to the latest data, although total income fell 6% from £849m to £803m between 2011 and 2012, the continued profitability suggests the fleet has made adjustments to counter rising costs.

    In terms of these costs, the majority of vessel owners who participated in the most recent survey said fuel costs were a significant challenge, as total expenditure on marine fuel increased 1% to £155m in 2012, compared to 2011. As a proportion of turnover, spending on fuel was estimated at close to one-fifth. Other costs that were identified as particularly challenging were those related to quota and the rising cost of bait.

    Despite the challenges there were still many who said they were optimistic about the future of the industry, while a number of these said they had ambitions to expand or upgrade their current operations during the next few years.

    John Anderson, Senior Economist at Seafish, said: "Our research indicates despite the particularly challenging financial environment, lower fish prices, lower incomes and higher fuel and quota costs, the UK's commercial fishing fleer maintained operating profit margins in 2012.

    "Debt repayment levels remain a concern however, with high debt to asset rations observed in several segments. And preliminary estimates suggest around two thirds of the UK fleet continued to experience decreased fishing income, gross value added and profits into 2013."

    Vessel owners can benefit directly from participation in the next round of research by requesting a free financial performance benchmark report which allows them to compare the performance of their own vessel with the average performance of other similar vessels. Participants will also be entered into a £250 prize draw.

    Barrie Deas, Chief Executive of the National Federation of Fishermen's Organisations (NFFO), said: "The stronger the economic information available, the stronger our ability to make the industry's arguments to Government at national and EU level. That is why we at the NFFO consider this survey and vessel owners' participation to be so important."

    Tom Pickerell, Technical Director of Seafish, said: "Thanks to the participation of several hundred vessel owners, the Economics Team at Seafish has been able to accurately represent the economic performance of the UK fishing fleet for a number of years.

    "Only with the continued support of the industry can we continue this hugely valuable exercise, producing outputs that allow us to better understand the industry as a whole and to inform key decision makers. Therefore, we would encourage skippers and boat owners across the UK to speak to our surveyors and complete the survey so that we can present the most accurate picture possible."

    The full report is available to download from the Seafish website /research--economics/industry-economics/fleet-statistics .

    Those interested in taking part in the next round of research should contact Steve Lawrence by emailing steven.lawrence@seafish.co.uk or call 0131 524 8632.

  7. #507
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    http://www.fishnewseu.com/scottish-n...h-smokers.html

    Funding boost for Arbroath Smokers

    THE Arbroath Smokies Association of Producers (ASAP) has received £2,358 from the Community Food Fund (CFF).

    Chairman of ASAP, Stuart Scott, told the Arbroath Herald it will make a big difference to their international exports. "We are very happy to receive the grant," he said.

    As part of the Scottish Government Think Local Project, the CFF has awarded £53,482 to support projects and events around Scotland that encourage people to appreciate and access local produce.

    Individual merchants in Arbroath are often asked for bulk or wholesale order that they are not equipped to fulfil. Five local fish merchants set up ASAP to try and find a way to meet the demand.

    Mr Scott told the newspaper: "Sometimes the orders were for half a ton of fish, which there is no way we could fill individually. It is too difficult to achieve alone."

    Stuart's Fresh Fish, Alex Spink and Sons, Arbroath Fisheries, M&M Smith and E&O Fish put their heads and talents together to find a solution.

    "We started thinking how to supply these companies and it appeared more costly than we first thought. There is vacuum packing, glossy literature, lab testing, marketing and lots more that needs considered before we can export on any scale.

    "Thanks to Douglas Watson of the Scottish Agricultural Organisation Society (SAOS) who recommended we apply for a grant and Lesley Walker from Angus Council. Without their help we wouldn't have been able to get the association off the ground."

    Scotland's Food Minister Richard Lochhead said: "Through the CFF, we are increasing access to fresh, seasonal, nutritious and local food, which is essential if we are to achieve our ambition of becoming a Good Food Nation."

  8. #508
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    http://www.fishnewseu.com/44-latest-...ity-quota.html

    Barrow boys consider community quota

    The NFFO's West Coast Committee has agreed to explore the feasibility of establishing a community quota scheme, following a successful pilot of the initiative in Ramsgate.

    The committee, which met in Barrow on July 4, agreed that having greater control over the allocation of quota in the local fleet would offer the potential advantages over the current monthly pool catch limits which are only going to become more challenging under any landings obligation.

    Chairman Ron Graham said: "It is important that we explore our options before either the landings obligation comes into effect or any further changes to domestic management come forward to address latent fleet capacity. We don't know what is the right model for the region yet but we need to be on the front foot looking at all possibilities and not waiting for something to happen that we then have to react to."

    The Federation intends to work to facilitate dialogue with the authorities and POs to examine what options could be possible to establish a community quota scheme for the region.

    The Committee also:
    •Reviewed progress on community projects supported by the West of Morecambe Fisheries Fund.
    •Agreed to field a spokesperson to ensure the plight of region's inshore fleet is fully represented in the face of the ill-conceived Commission proposal to ban drift nets.
    •Reviewed a project to look at changes to fishing practice in the vicinity of Eastern Irish Sea wind farm sites.
    •Agreed to investigate proposed controlled sewage discharge proposals and the risks to the seasonal mussel fishery in the Duddan estuary.
    •Agreed to propose using the NFFO Trust Fund allocations to the Committee to support currently unfunded fishermen's training courses.
    •Reviewed NWIFCA developing proposals for the Morecambe Bay Hybrid Order which included a Byelaw in respect of vessel length for vessels working inside the jurisdiction of the NWIFCA district.

  9. #509
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    Foreign fishing rights

    http://www.worldfishing.net/news101/...fishing-rights

    At a parliamentary meeting on Monday, UK MPs agreed to back a call for the rights of foreign vessels to fish in UK coastal waters to be revoked and reclaimed for the use of low impact, local fishermen.

    Many European member states currently have significant historic rights to fish in the waters that are 6-12 nautical miles from the UK’s coastline. The MPs are concerned that this is having a serious impact on the marine environment, and further threatens the survival of low impact, coastal fishermen and the fish stocks they depend on.

    In the UK, depleted stocks are struggling to recover from overfishing and international fisheries scientists estimate that 41% of stocks are still overfished in the Atlantic and surrounding seas. Consequently fishermen have faced a steady decline in their catches. In 2009 the UK fishing fleet landed the lowest haul since records began.

    Twelve MPs have signed up to a five-step plan aimed at regenerating the UK’s inshore waters, fisheries and coastal communities through quota redistribution; regionalisation of fisheries management and reclaiming coastal waters for small scale fishermen. The plan was jointly launched by the New Under Ten Fishermen’s Association (NUTFA) and Greenpeace. They are campaigning for the government to implement the policies in the reformed CFP which reward fishermen who use more selective, low-impact fishing methods, and who maximise social and employment benefits for local communities.

    Jerry Percy, Chief Executive of NUTFA said, “Once busy and thriving, many coastal fishing communities have crumbled, fishing harbours turned into yacht parks and fishing beaches that are no longer home to fishing boats. This is the reality for much of modern coastal England. But there is hope. Hope in new legislation sensibly implemented, hope in the realisation that smaller scale fishermen are not the problem but a solution to many of the challenges facing us and hope that politicians will recognise the wealth that has been lost, but is there to be regained in terms of jobs, fish stocks and reinvigorated communities.”

  10. #510
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    http://www.fishnewseu.com/44-latest-...el-report.html

    Questions asked over Channel report

    THE recent damning report on the impact that fisheries have had on the English Channel's ecosystem during the past 90 years is incomplete and misleading, according to Seafish.

    Bill Lart, Sustainability Advisor for industry authority on seafood, Seafish, comments: "Ensuring a sustainable future for the UK fishing industry, while managing fish stocks responsibly are our key objectives at Seafish, so we were pleased to see this recent report on the effect of fishing the English Channel bring this important issue to the public's attention.

    "However, we believe the report's sole reliance on landed catches data paints an incomplete picture of the current situation in the Channel, and risks taking away from the significant efforts already undertaken to address the issue.

    "In failing to take into account additional factors - such as changes to fishing strategies over time in response to market demand and new management measures, and the impact of natural changes in temperature and climactic effects - the report leaves itself open to questions around its robustness.

    "Claims that cod and haddock are 'fast running out', for example, directly contradict established data from the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea (ICES), which shows the status of these stocks has improved during the past few years.

    "Moreover, the EU's Common Fisheries Policy is set to bring stocks to Maximum Sustainable Yield (MSY) in the near future, and has already significantly reduced overfishing in European Atlantic Waters, the North Sea and the Baltic Sea.

    "Among stocks measured against their Maximum Sustainable Yield (MSY), just 41% are now considered to be overfished which is a sizeable improvement on the 94% we saw just a decade ago in 2003.

    "Meanwhile, the number of stocks estimated to be fished at MSY levels had increased from just two in 2003, to 27 by 2012, and with further improvements to the policy on discards under the new landing obligation, we expect this trend to continue in the years to come.

    "Analysis of the practice of scallop dredging has also found that contrary to being an indiscriminately, and over used method of fishing, most of it is targeted on specific core areas based on analysis of echo sounder observations and knowledge of previous catches. Although we do recognise that scallop dredging can have an effect on seabed ecosystems, and have published a good practice guide for scallop dredging.

    "Along with the EU Habitat Directive and commitments under OSPAR aimed at protecting vulnerable habitats in the North East Atlantic, the EU's Marine Strategy Framework Directive is an important stimulus towards improving sustainability.

    "As well as using data on fish catches, it collects independent information on demersal fisheries using research vessel surveys to determine the impact of these fisheries on the marine environment.

    "As a result fishing practices have already been adapted to ensure fish stock sustainability, while protection measures have been brought in to protect the most vulnerable.

    "For example, significant efforts have been made by the EU, ICES, DEFRA and the UK Commercial fishing industry to address the issue of declining Common Skate populations, with the species and others in the elasmobranch family such as Spurdog now protected under Zero Allowable Catch regulations.

    "There is no doubt fisheries have the capacity to change marine biodiversity. The issue is to protect the more vulnerable ecosystems and examine to what extent management measures are required to ensure that effects on seabed habitats inside and outside the 'core areas' are sustainable. Just recently, we worked with Seafood Cornwall to develop a model to help fisheries in the South West become more sustainable by helping them to identify the areas with increased risk.

    "The importance of collaboration should not be understated; fishers, government and scientists need to do more to work together to undertake research and address research. Seafish believes this will be the key to ensuring the sustainability of the UK's fishing industry, and safeguarding our fish stocks for generations to come."

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