The Real Fish Fight - Support Our Fishing Communities - Page 50
Page 50 of 60 FirstFirst ... 404849505152 ... LastLast
Results 491 to 500 of 597

Thread: The Real Fish Fight - Support Our Fishing Communities

  1. #491
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Fraserburgh , Scotland
    Posts
    16,361

    Default

    http://www.fishnewseu.com/scottish-n...re-pupils.html

    Fishfest for Renfrewshire pupils

    MORE than 360 high school and primary pupils and their teachers are being given a crash course in the importance of Scottish seafood – both for their own health and the economic health of the nation – at an event taking place in Johnstone High School, in Renfrewshire, on 27-28 May.

    The event is centred round a series of workshops, which are part of Seafood Scotland's Seafood in schools project, and aim to teach children where seafood comes from, why it is healthy to eat, and how it gets to their plates. Each pupil will attend three half-hour workshops, whilst a session at lunchtime for teachers will give them more confidence in using seafood as a context for learning.

    The wetfish counter display allows pupils to see and handle a variety of Scottish species and to learn how they are caught, landed and processed. It will be run by Seafood in Schools coordinator Sheila Bannerman, with Marine Scotland scientist Jennifer Wright providing an insight into how fish and shellfish live in the marine environment.

    "I am delighted to work with the Seafood in Schools programme, which is a great way to encourage more children to eat seafood and help them learn about sustainable fishing," said Jennifer.

    Local chef Vanessa Daley from Mar Hall is hosting the second workshop, and will be cooking up some quick, easy and tasty seafood dishes for pupils to try. Vanessa will also be handing out recipe leaflets and hopes that parents will be inspired to try them at home.

    The third workshop concentrates on health and wellbeing and the importance of eating foods high in Omega-3. Run by Catriona Frankitti of Fish For Health, the session also features a tutored tasting session using crab, brisling sardines, mackerel, trout, salmon and herring – provided by RR Spink, International Fish Canners, Macrae/Young's, Daniels Sweet Herring, and Orkney Crab – as well as oatcakes from Nairns. Fish for the display and cookery demonstrations is kindly donated by Glasgow Market-based seafood wholesaler John Valance, the Scottish Salmon Producers Organisation and Lions Speciality Food.

    Scott Landsburgh, Chief Executive of Scottish Salmon Producers' Organisation, said: "We are proud to be part of such an engaging event. Scottish farmed salmon is known to be rich in Omega-3 fatty acids, key components of a healthy balanced diet. Research shows that eating food rich in Omega-3s helps children improve their ability to learn and concentrate in the classroom, as well as providing many other health benefits to people of all ages.

    "Families will have the opportunity to learn more about the salmon farming industry, which plays such a pivotal role as one of Scotland's economic successes, and can offer our future workforce a range of career opportunities."

    To help reinforce the learning experience at home, parents and friends are invited to a community event from 1615 to 1700 today. They will be able to experience the same workshops and find out just how much their children know about Scottish seafood.

    In addition to students from Johnstone High School, pupils will attend from Auchenlodment, Cochrane Castle, Fordbank, Howwood, Kilbarchan, Lochwinnoch and Thorn primary schools. Their transport is funded through the Seafood in Schools project.

    Following the workshops, each participating class will undertake a project of their choosing using seafood as a context for learning, which they must demonstrate to the rest of the school through an assembly or similar activity. "In this way, we ensure that the Seafood in Schools programme and the messages it teaches, have a very wide reach," said Sheila Bannerman.

  2. #492
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Fraserburgh , Scotland
    Posts
    16,361

    Default

    Fishing group hits back on Hugh's Fish Fight

    http://www.fishupdate.com/news/fulls...ish_Fight.html



    THE National Federation of Fishermen's Organisations has accused the Hugh's Fish Fight TV programmes of presenting a less than balanced picture on the situation around the controversial discards debate

    The NFFO said in a statement: "It is perhaps not surprising that Hugh’s Fish Fight is now mounting a rather desperate attempt to shore up the credibility of its campaign to ban discards, after a powerful piece in the Times suggested that the public and politicians were misled into supporting an EU discard ban."

    The Federation says evidence was presented to the Fish Fight campaign to show that discards in our fisheries were not a static or growing problem but were in fact, being steadily reduced. The NFFO advised Hugh, on film, that discarding by the English fleet had been reduced by 50% over the previous decade. That statistic did not appear in any of his programmes.

    Information on discard trends had been reinforced more recently by further work in ICES, that confirms that the absolute amount of discards in the North Sea roundfish fisheries (one of those in which discards have historically been very high) have been reduced by 90% over the last 20 years. There are a number of reasons for this drastic reduction including, a significantly smaller fleet, using more selective gear, over a period of lower recruitment.

    The statistics on the general discard trends were there at the time, for anyone who cared to look, as Hugh’s campaign reached its crescendo. The point is that Hugh’s Fish Fight didn’t look very hard for them, presumably because they would have spoiled a rather simple narrative of a hero at the head of a crusade.

    The Federation says it has taken the view that discards are a major problem insome of our fisheries and that the Common fisheries Policy has amplified the problem by the way it has managed its fisheries. That much we have in common with Hugh.

    "Where we part company with Hugh is his belief is that an EU ban is the best way to secure further progress is through a top-down blanket ban (albeit with some scope for flexibilities and exemptions."

    It adds: "Fishermen from right around the coast feel aggrieved that they now face a period of uncertainty and change on a massive scale, with no

  3. #493
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Fraserburgh , Scotland
    Posts
    16,361

    Default

    http://www.fishnewseu.com/46-latest-...defection.html

    Discard doubts lead to defection

    A PROMINENT fisheries scientist, Martin Pastoors, is leaving his role in the GAP2 project to join the fishing industry, as he feels this is more effective way of ensuring fish conservation.

    Having worked with GAP2 – a project that aims to demonstrate the role and value of stakeholder driven science within the context of fisheries' governance – for the past three years, Pastoors has resigned as leader of Work Package 3 and is taking up a new role as the first Chief Science Officer at the Pelagic Freezer-trawler Association (PFA).

    One of the main reasons for leaving GAP2, he explains, is the problems that are likely to be caused by the implementation of the EU's discard ban.

    "The main challenge that I see at the moment is to keep the fishing industry onboard when the policy is looking for drastic changes but without very good explanations or means. I am really concerned that the new discard ban could do a lot of harm to the positive developments that we have seen over the last decade with the decline in fishing mortality, with the RACs as platforms of collaboration and with initiatives like the Scottish conservation credit scheme. The discard ban is a very complex piece of legislation that is very very difficult to explain. There have been many meetings already trying to figure out what the different elements mean. Taking the discard ban as a learning process, then it could develop in something positive. But if it would be rolled out as a control and enforcement approach, I am really concerned that it will do much more harm than good.

    "Overall the challenge that I see is to go from a very hierarchical top-down micromanagement style of fisheries management to a management style that is more comparable to other industries: where society gives out a license to produce but the industry needs to demonstrate that it complies with the license. Making the industry responsible to society instead of society telling the industry what to do. That is also why I have taken the strategic decision to be part of the industry and trying to work in that direction."

  4. #494
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Fraserburgh , Scotland
    Posts
    16,361

    Default

    http://www.nffo.org.uk/news/se_fishe...s_net_ban.html

    South East Fisherman Rejects Drift Net Ban

    Peter Caunter , Skipper/owner of the under-10metre netter MFV Yvonne Anne, writes about the impact that the total ban on EU drift nets would have on the fishery in fishery south east of England

    Reference points: Dover (Kent) to Yarmouth ( Suffolk)

    For hundreds of years traditional drift netting has been carried out by small to medium sized boats targeting herring and sprat all along the south east coast with no known adverse effect on the environment. In this fishery, there is very little if any in the way of bycatch of non-target species of any kind be it fish, mammal or bird.

    In recent years these fisheries have declined to a few small communities, but none- the-less this fishery is important to make up boats’ annual income, very often because of the limited range of these small boats at a time when there is no access to other species.

    In more recent years, since the invention monofilament netting, a small-scale drift net fishery for bass and mullet has developed and is now the predominant fishing method of the under-10 meter fleet in the south east region. Within the last 20 years several variations to the drift net fishery have come into the fishery none more so than the use of drifting trammel nets along the sea bed for Dover sole. By changing mesh sizes the same method has proved to be very economical way of catching a variety of commercially valuable fish species all year round - not just a short seasonal fishery as being suggested by the Commission With the clean sandy nature of much of the sea bed in the region this method has replaced the trawl, mainly due to the ever rising cost of fuel. Boats using drift nets, of one sort or another, outnumber trawlers by around 10 to 1.

    A total ban on all drift netting if implemented would have frightening consequences for the under-10m fleet of the south east, rendering most redundant. These boats are designed and built solely for the drift net fishery and would not be able to revert to other fishing methods. Similarly, the scope for setting nets on anchors as an alternative, would very limited due to the strong tides and turbulent nature of most areas fished, along with other issues of catch quality and discards. Rough ground, suitable for lobsters and crab is limited and already fully exploited. I suppose some boats could revert back to trawling but with fuel prices as they are, trawling with a small boat has become less and less viable.

    It could be argued that a drift net with a light lead line tickling along the sea bed actually has a very low environmental impact.

    Long lining, another traditional fishery, has become less popular due to the price of bait and as far as I am aware nobody has ever made a living catching Dover sole on a long line.

    The reasons for the proposed ban of all drift net fisheries by the EU Commission are due to by catch of protected species of fish, diving birds , turtles and cetaceans; most of the references given concern the tuna fishery of the Mediterranean.

    In recent years there have been several quite detailed surveys of the inshore fisheries of the south-east, including observers monitoring discards and catches of birds, especially with reference to the red throated diver which overwinter along this coast in large numbers. As far as I am aware, there have been no reports of any catches of birds of any species; catches of cetaceans are so rare as to be negligible and are thought to pose no overall threat to the populations of these mammals. Discards of fish are at a minimum in some cases non-existent. All in all, there seem to be no similarities to the drift net fisheries of the Mediterranean, which seems to be the target for this ban. CEFAS should have all the data needed to confirm what I have said.

    There is no justification for such a drastic heavy handed approach as a total ban on drift net fisheries of the south-east.

    I would hope that the fishing industry has the full backing of all fishery management departments to stop this proposed ban becoming a reality.

  5. #495
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Fraserburgh , Scotland
    Posts
    16,361

    Default

    http://www.fishnewseu.com/44-latest-...fisheries.html

    Ban would scupper sustainable fisheries

    THE Commission's hard-nosed response to concerns about the proposed EU ban on drift nets, suggests that overturning the blanket ban could be a long haul, according to the NFFO, despite the fact that some of these fisheries are accredited as sustainable by the Marine Stewardship Council (MSC).

    Maria Damanaki's spokeswoman, Helene Banner, has said she is fully aware of the situation in the United Kingdom, but has no intention of withdrawing the proposal and hopes to have it in place by 1 January 2015.

    NFFO says that there are signs that Defra is also of the view that this is a sledgehammer to crack a nut and will oppose the blanket nature of the ban, and press for other solutions to the problems faced in the Mediterranean. It is likely to be able to count on France as an ally, as it too has many small-scale seasonal drift net fisheries.

    It is the scale of the Commission's misunderstanding of the nature of inshore fishing that is frustrating NFFO members. They seem to think that it is realistic or feasible to shift from drift net to purse seine or other gears at will. They have no understanding of the practical issues, never mind the licensing requirements. It smacks of Marie Antoinette's lesser-known remark, "Let them use seine nets," the Federation quips.

    "Having made a proposal, it will now follow the normal EU legislative procedure for co-decision but the Commission's hope that it could be law by Christmas is well wide of the mark. The signs are that the Greek Presidency (to the end of June) won't touch it and the Italian Presidency (July to December) have a lot of other things on their plate. In the European Parliament the proposal could be amended or blocked and the Council of Ministers will have their say in due course. Whatever the outcome, it is going to take time and the outcome is likely to be something very different from the current proposal.

    "A happy outcome cannot be assumed, however, and it is important for the NFFO and its allies to ensure that all the decision makers know what is at stake. If we cannot get the proposal withdrawn in its entirety, we will press for significant amendments that will ensure the survival of our small-scale and fully sustainable drift net fisheries," concludes the NFFO.

  6. #496
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Fraserburgh , Scotland
    Posts
    16,361

    Default

    http://www.fishnewseu.com/46-latest-...-bass-tac.html

    Anglers fear bass TAC

    THE successful development of a sea bass management plan, which is currently under preparation by EU Member States, is seen by anglers and scientists a vital means of helping to preserve dwindling stocks of this important species and of preventing commercial bass fishermen from being awarded a TAC.

    The plan deals with the Irish Sea, Celtic Sea, English Channel, and southern North Sea, where European sea bass is one of the most important and valuable species to recreational angling and its dependant businesses. Sea bass were historically exploited primarily by recreational anglers until commercial fisheries for bass expanded dramatically in the 1960-70s. Now European sea bass stocks are in decline due to overfishing and poor recruitment in recent years. Something needs be done, say scientists, the European Commission and the European Anglers Alliance (EAA).

    If the EU Member States involved don't agree a regional plan soon then the European Commission might include sea bass in the TAC and quota system for the first time warns EAA. Only France would be happy about that and could reasonably expect to be allocated the biggest part of any such TAC, more than 60% based on historic declared landings. EAA is opposed to a sea bass TAC for a number of reasons and has developed a position paper, which it hopes will help to avoid a sea bass TAC and encourage Member States to agree a sea bass management plan.

    The preparation of a suitable sea bass management plan is a difficult task, as lack of sufficient scientific information presents a significant problem. The change in the European fisheries management regime based on landings to one based on catches, which includes discard bans for some fisheries, is another issue, which may need to be factored in. Existing CFP management areas complicate the development of such a plan. This sea bass plan only concerns some Northern EU waters but there are sea bass in other EU waters also. Therefore, an EU wide sea bass management plan has to be developed gradually and adjusted in the short/medium term and in the longer term.

    Commercial catches in 2012 were 4060 tonnes, while ICES has advised that commercial landings should be no more than 2707 tonnes this year a significant reduction that mirrors the fact that the sea bass stock is in serious trouble, says EAA. In its position paper EAA has given an estimate for the number of anglers fishing for sea bass and the socio-economic value of these anglers to Europe as a whole. EAA estimates that 2 million sea anglers, out of 8-10 million in total, regularly or occasionally target sea bass in EU waters. One million of these anglers fish the waters concerned by this bass management plan.

    EAA conservatively estimates the socio-economic value of recreational bass angling to be an average of 100 per bass angler per year. Government surveys show much higher values for sea anglers in general, for example the Sea Angling 2012 study in the United Kingdom estimated that:

    "annual trip spend per angler is 761 (795 including major items) and annual spend on major items is 633 per sea angler giving an overall total of 1,394 per sea angler"; (1,700).

    However, EAA has chosen a much lower estimate a portion of the total spend to reflect that most sea anglers would also target and catch fish other than bass, even if bass is their preferred species.

  7. #497
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Fraserburgh , Scotland
    Posts
    16,361

    Default

    http://www.fishnewseu.com/46-latest-...conundrum.html

    Solving the Celtic conundrum

    AN initiative at the cutting edge of fisheries/science collaboration, called the Damara Project, has been launched to test various management options for mixed fisheries, such as the Celtic Sea.

    What is particularly novel about Demara is that it puts fisheries stakeholders in the driving seat right from the outset. The project builds on work already undertaken by the North West Waters Advisory Council in preparing objectives for the mixed fisheries in ICES areas VIIf and g of the Celtic Sea.

    The most recent meeting of the initiative, which was held in Dublin:
    •Agreed the project's core principles.
    •Agreed the key questions that it would address.
    •Discussed the kind of technical modelling that it would require.
    • Agreed a timetable for the project to work to.

    The problems associated with single species management plans (famously, the discredited EU Cod Management Plan) are well known and there is an intense search for ways to put management plans for demersal stocks on a mixed fishery basis. The Damara project, if successful, will offer a practical tool to allow fisheries stakeholders to define the shape of their own plan. Although the focus is on the Celtic Sea, the model will potentially be of relevance to the development of long term management plans for many other fisheries.

    The Damara project will not be without its challenges. These include the impact of the EU landings obligation which is likely to alter fishing behaviours and render assumptions based on past patterns redundant. Equally, there are important data deficiencies to be addressed. Nevertheless, providing a baseline understanding of the current situation will inform future management options and put stakeholders in a much stronger position.

    At present fisheries administrators in EU Member States are preoccupied with developing discard plans. But it is intended to keep relevant member states fully advised about the project as it develops and at an appropriate juncture to invite their involvement in discussions. The project is strongly predicated on a regional seas approach to fisheries management and bottom-up initiatives.

    The modellers involved in the project will now prepare the first version of their decision support tool, which will be the subject of scrutiny and discussion at the next meeting, in October.

  8. #498
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Fraserburgh , Scotland
    Posts
    16,361

    Default

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/debate/ar...old-river.html

    How Britain was sold down the river: A Grimsby fisherman and a new set of European rules that stopped him catching a Dover sole for supper

    Grimsby was once the busiest fishing port in the world, boasting a fleet of 700 trawlers. It was killed by the Icelandic cod wars of the early Seventies and the EU’s Common Fisheries Policy.

    Britain’s fishing industry was sacrificed on the altar of Edward Heath’s desperation to join the old Common Market at any cost. Our traditional waters were handed over to foreign factory ships in exchange for a place at the subsidised lobster supper tables of Brussels.

    Today there are just five trawlers operating out of Grimsby — a third of the number of boats servicing off-shore wind farms in the Humber Estuary.

    Tens of thousands of men lost their jobs when their boats were decommissioned. One of the casualties was Earnest ‘Bubs’ Cromer, a former trawler skipper.

    Bubs, as he’s known by everyone, is now 76 and recovering from prostate cancer and a knee replacement operation. He retains his love of the sea and fishing.

    His daily exercise consists of walking 60 yards out into the estuary to inspect a net tethered on the mud-flats to catch fish on the incoming tide. It’s a method which has been used by locals on the banks between Grimsby and Cleethorpes for generations.

    On a good day, he might catch two small Dover sole, weighing about a pound each, enough for a decent dinner for himself and his wife Kirsten.

    Some days the net is empty. But if he catches more than a couple of fish, he gives them away to friends and neighbours. By no means is this a commercial operation.

    Until fairly recently there were about 15 nets pegged out on the flats. Bubs hadn’t been back for a while because he was recuperating from his surgery.

    Happily, his doctor has now told him he can start to take regular exercise again. Earlier this week, at low tide, Bubs returned to the estuary to check his net. He was approached by two ‘beach safety officers’ in hi-viz jackets, naturally, riding beach-buggies.

    They said he would have to remove his net or it would be confiscated and destroyed. Bubs was told he was in breach of a new bye-law and was advised to ring the North Eastern Inshore Fisheries and Conservation Authority (NEIFCA) for further information.

    When he rang: ‘They said I was in contravention of some regulation so-and-so from 2013 and if I didn’t remove my net from the beach they would do it for me.

    ‘I couldn’t understand it. People have been fishing this stretch since time immemorial, certainly as long as I can remember. I’ve had no problem in the past, so why now?’

    Bubs emailed me. He’d read last week’s column, about an 83-year-old man persecuted by Greater Manchester Police for giving his infirm wife a pain-killing patch, headlined ‘Modern Britain: No Country For Old Men’ and thought I might be interested in his plight.

    ‘No country for old men is about right. That’s exactly how I feel about this. What are we supposed to do — go away and die?’

    I decided to investigate. On the authority’s website, there’s a picture of its Chief Officer, David McCandless, and an invitation to ‘Ask The Chief’ a question by email.

    So I did, expecting it to disappear into a bureaucratic black hole. The following morning I received a personal reply from Chief McCandless. I was impressed. Most people in his position hide behind a battalion of PR officers.
    Grimsby was once the busiest fishing port in the world, boasting a fleet of 700 trawlers. It was killed by the Icelandic cod wars of the early Seventies and the EU’s Common Fisheries Policy

    He explained it was his job to enforce laws relating to fish conservation between the Tyne and the North Lincolnshire coast. ‘One such regulation relates to the management of fixed engines or nets and has been in force since the Nineties.

    ‘Specifically it protects and conserves migratory species such as salmon and eels in the estuarine and marine environment and other marine species from over-exploitation. In doing so, it prohibits the setting of any type of fixed net in the Humber, specifically in the intertidal zone.

    ‘We received an enquiry from a member of the public this Monday seeking guidance on the application of that regulation and that guidance was supplied.

    ‘The regulations apply across the board to everyone and we have to apply them fairly and evenly to all stake-holders.’ I appreciate that Chief McCandless has a job to do. But, if the rules have been in place since the Nineties, why are they only being applied now?

    Elsewhere on the website, there’s a copy of the Humber Estuary Fishing Bye-law. This states: ‘No person shall dig, use any pots, traps, nets (whether fixed, anchored to the sea-bed, or not) trawls, dredges or similar devices within the Specified Area.’

    Scroll down, however, and you’ll see it was only drawn up last September and signed into law by the civil servant in charge of sustainable fisheries on January 30 this year.

    That would explain why, before Bubs began his treatment, there were 15 nets on the mud-flats and now there’s only his left. Obviously, there has been a concerted operation over the past six months to clear out locals fishing the mud-flats. Why? What harm are they doing? Between them, they can only have been catching a few dozen fish every week.

    Bubs points out that just along the estuary there is a power station which kills tons of immature fish every year by sucking them into its water-cooling intake.

    This is, on the face of it, another story of the little man being crushed by an overbearing bureaucracy. But it is much, much more than that.

    It’s about how we are governed, how short-term political obsession takes priority over people’s best interests, and how our way of life has been changed irrevocably by our membership of the European Union.
    Not for the first time over the past few weeks have I had cause to reflect on what my father’s generation would think of the nation they fought so gallantly to defend

    The bye-law which bans Bubs from casting his net for Dover sole may have been signed by a British civil servant but it will have had its origins in a directive from Brussels.

    Fish conservation in the Humber wouldn’t even be necessary had the politicians not handed over our traditional waters in the North Sea to foreign fleets who Hoovered up everything on an industrial scale. Stocks of cod, haddock and other species were harvested virtually to extinction.

    The destruction of the British fishing industry is one of the greatest betrayals in our history. During World War II, the only food not on ration was fish and chips. That was because brave fishermen from Grimsby and elsewhere risked life and limb to bring home their catch from treacherous waters in constant danger of being sunk by enemy warships and submarines.

    Their reward, in their own lifetime, was to watch impotently as politicians such as the ghastly Grocer Heath sold them out in the cause of the doomed ideal of creating a European superstate.

    They had to stand back and watch their boats being burned while British waters were plundered by foreign fishermen, with the collaboration of their own government. What would these men make of the once-proud port of Grimsby today?

    All you need to know about modern Britain is that there are three times more boats servicing utterly useless and expensive wind turbines in the Humber Estuary than there are actually catching fish.

    Instead of boasting the world’s greatest fishing fleet, we are employing hi-viz wardens on beach-buggies to stop redundant trawler skippers like Bubs Cromer from netting a couple of Dover sole for the dinner table.

    Not for the first time over the past few weeks have I had cause to reflect on what my father’s generation would think of the nation they fought so gallantly to defend.

    No country for old men? You can say that again.

  9. #499
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Fraserburgh , Scotland
    Posts
    16,361

    Default

    MMO response about the EU blanket ban on drift net fishing



    10455850_261493220701177_8318221867675990881_n.jpg

  10. #500
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Fraserburgh , Scotland
    Posts
    16,361

    Default

    http://www.fishnewseu.com/scottish-n...ive-warns.html

    Fleet in jeopardy from discard ban, SWFPA chief executive warns

    A SIGNIFICANT section of Scotland's whitefish fleet may not survive the introduction of the discard ban, the leader of the country's biggest fishing association has warned.

    While welcoming reform of the Common Fisheries Policy (CFP), Mike Park, chief executive of the Scottish White Fish Producers Association (SWFPA), said successful implementation of the landings obligation in January 2016 would be an "enormous challenge" for government and industry.

    "Maintaining an economically viable fleet will be hugely difficult – if not impossible – if the discard ban comes in without other major changes to the management regime," he said.

    "A move in emphasis away from landings to catches provides real potential for fishing businesses to prosper.

    "But it is imperative that the issues in the way are identified early and tackled to ensure a future for the industry around our shores."

    In the SWFPA's official response to the European Commission consultation on technical measures in the reformed CFP, Mr Park identifies the key issues as:

    • Choke species – types of fish that are abundant but have low quotas which in a mixed fishery are quickly exhausted, preventing further fishing for the main target species

    • A command and control approach from the European Commission on technical measures which contradicts the move to regional management in the reformed CFP

    • Failure of the derogations in the reformed CFP to provide a "soft landing" for the discard ban to give time for it to be implemented satisfactorily.

    In the response, Mr Park says: "The cod fishery to the west of Scotland is one area where a total allowable catch (TAC) aligned to maximum sustainable yield (MSY) would deliver around one fifth of the tonnage required to maintain and fully prosecute the target fishery of monkfish.

    "There are many other fisheries where insistence that MSY is maintained for by-catch will lead to an early loss of economic viability.

    "It is beyond reason therefore to expect simultaneous delivery of economic viability, MSY harvesting and the landings obligation."

    Mr Park calls on the Commission to abandon its prescriptive approach to regulating the mechanics of fishing.

    "Paternalism and top down management have no place in output-focused management. It would be supremely duplicitous to hand the reins of responsibility to fishers, then to prescribe how they should make the best fit; it is very much at odds with a move to regional management."

    He says the SWFPA agrees with the North Sea Advisory Council, which has said that "in terms of presenting technical measures, it is time for the Commission, Council of Ministers and European Parliament to leave the stage".

    He adds: "What should be avoided is any prescriptiveness with regard to net characteristics, reference gears or set limits on species mix."

    Mr Park also calls for the abandonment of limits on days at sea and the one net rule.

    The SWFPA represents 200 boats and 1,200 fishermen operating across a wide range of gear types, target species and management areas.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •