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Thread: UK SAC's/MPA's/MCZ's

  1. #51
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    http://www.fishupdate.com/news/fulls...ion_zones.html

    NFFO responds to today's government announcement on marine conservation zones



    This morning the government announced the location for 27 marine conservation zones, covering 9,700 kilometres squared (km2) from the Aln estuary in the north-east to Beachy Head and Chesil Beach in the south and Padstow Bay and the Scilly Isles in the south-west.

    While some have criticised the government for backing down from the initial 127 areas it planned, the National Federation of Fishermen’s Organisations (NFFO) has welcomed this more considered approach that has taken into account scientific advice and the socio-economic effects.

    Below is a comment from the NFFO’s chief executive, Barrie Deas, on the news:

    “The fishing industry welcomes today’s announcement that the Government has elected to continue building a network of marine protected areas using a scientific and phased approach. Decision makers received 40,000 responses to its consultation exercise, many of them from fishermen and fishing organisations worried about their livelihoods. Today’s decision confirms the Government has balanced scientific information on vulnerable habitats, with data on the socio-economic consequences of applying management measures within each designated zone to find a solution which brings benefits to all.

    “We warned it would be vital to listen carefully to the local fishing industry potentially affected by each recommended Marine Conservation Zone (MCZ) and to ensure adequate evidence was gathered about the conservation features within them. Without scientific backing there was a real danger MCZs could turn into a tick-box exercise with zero conservation advantage but maximum disruption to fishing operations, livelihoods and communities. The Government has successfully resisted pressure from a coalition of media oriented NGOs, and the odd celebrity chef, who appeared more concerned with headlines than putting the MCZs in the right place or the livelihoods of our island nation’s fishermen. This decision is a victory for good planning and a scientific approach.”

  2. #52
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    http://www.fishnewseu.com/component/...trictions.html

    SEAFSH has welcomed the news that only about a fifth of the conservation zones recently proposed for UK waters are going to be implemented.

    Tom Pickerell, Technical Director of Seafish, said: "Seafish welcomes the announcement that 27 of the 127 proposed Marine Conservation Zones (MCZs) are to be designated in UK waters. We see this important first step as a clear indication that, in the case of MCZs, basing designation on quality of evidence rather than merely numbers is the best approach at this stage.

    "It is our hope that this considered approach will also include long-term monitoring of the zones, something parties from all sides of the debate agree is crucial to their success.

    "The key to establishing this first tranche of zones has been collaboration between scientists, NGOs, Government and the industry, and that will also be the key in producing the evidence for further MCZ designations over the next three years. Seafish will continue work with industry and other agencies to support the work towards these as part of an ecologically coherent network of MPAs for the UK."

  3. #53
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    http://www.nffo.org.uk/news/rac_view_on_cod.html

    North Sea RAC Takes View on North Sea Cod

    The North Sea RAC has suggested that the TAC for North Sea cod should be increased in order to strike a balance between rebuilding the stock and reducing discards.

    “We would normally advise that where there is a long term management plan it should be followed”, said Niels Wichmann, chairman of the NSRAC.

    “However, in the case of North Sea cod, there are exceptional circumstances, not least that the impasse between the Council and the European Parliament, that has blocked a review and revision of the Cod Plan”, he said. This would be a departure from the terms of the long term management plan but we think, having looked carefully at the science and the fishery that in these circumstances it is justified.

    We have looked very carefully at ICES advice and have come to the conclusion that a cautious increase in the TAC of around 10% would help to reduce discards in 2014 whilst maintaining the steady rebuilding of the spawning stock biomass. We are very encouraged that the science has recorded the seventh successive annual increase in the biomass.”

    The RAC has also suggested that again there should be no reduction in permitted days-at-sea in 2014.

    “If we set aside the complex constitutional issues, there is widespread agreement that nothing would be achieved by a further cut and indeed a reduction in effort could undermine the varied conservation initiatives put in place through partnerships between the member states and the fishing industry.”

    “This is a view that has been reached after long discussions and close scrutiny of the scientific advice. It is unanimously supported by all groups within the RAC.”

  4. #54
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    http://www.fishnewseu.com/scottish-n...v-va-boom.html

    A LOCAL charity aims to ensure that a community-based management structure is established in the Barra's new Special Area of Conservation (SAC).

    Voluntary Action Barra and Vatersay (VABV) will be working with the local communities to provide options for a governance structure that will be presented to Ministers this summer, and then establish the management group later this year. Marine Scotland will continue to provide support as required throughout this process.

    Last year it was announced that the Sound of Barra was to be given international recognition to make the site a SAC. Following this decision the Environment Minister, Paul Wheelhouse, confirmed that local people would have a leading role in the future management of the SAC.

    According to Wheelhouse, VABV has adopted the following guiding principles to create a community management group:

    * Appropriate governance that delivers a greater understanding of needs

    * Partnership working to reach public interest decisions

    * Empowerment by influencing the decisions that affect lives

    * Community driven, with local accountability

    * Aspirational, inclusive, and wide ranging

    * New ideas, solutions and innovation

    In a statement issued today the Minister argued that: "The Sound of Barra SAC is a diverse and precious environment, home to important seal populations with reefs and sandbanks that support many species.

    "I have previously said a community-led approach to the management structure will ensure as much local involvement as possible. I want all those with an interest to work constructively with VABV to secure a bright future for Sound of Barra and the wider region. I look forward to visiting again later this year."

    VABV Development Manager Eoin MacNeil said: "Voluntary Action Barra & Vatersay is delighted to facilitate this piece of work on behalf of our island communities. The Sound of Barra is a truly rich environment and it is vital that the community are central to leading and managing this great resource, recognising and building on all it has to offer."

    Western Isles Councillor Donald Manford said: "Since the last century our community has been striving to stem the relentless loss of influence over the environment and resources around our shores. We have for the first time an exciting opportunity to create a structure which will empower the people who work here to actively manage our resources."

  5. #55
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    http://www.fishnewseu.com/44-latest-...ve-impact.html

    MPAC’s positive impact

    THE NFFO will continue to part-fund the MPA Fishing Coalition (MPAC) to help ensure that Westminster listens to fishermen before finalising its planned network of marine protected areas (MPAs).

    The Federation credits MPAC with having brought a sense of realism to the implementation of MPAs and halting a headlong rush to establish protected areas on poorly considered grounds. By insisting that the fishing industry has a genuine voice in the designation of marine conservation zones, and that both designation and management measures are always based on sound evidence, MPAC has striven to reduce the effects of the displacement of fishing activity from its customary grounds.

    Chaired by fisheries scientist Dr Stephen Lockwood, MPAC holds regular meetings with DEFRA, the MMO, Natural England and the IFCAs, to discuss the programme of MPAs as it unfolds.

    MPAC has to date been supported financially by a wide range of fishermen's associations and individual fishermen fearful of their livelihoods. Support has also been received from fishermen's organisations in the Netherlands, France, Ireland and Belgium, which are also fearful of the impact of poorly designed and located MPAs.

    The value of MPAs in protecting vulnerable species and seabed features is fully recognised, but MPAC argues that it is essential they are established via a rational, fair and balanced process, not by "a sometimes irrational push by naïve enthusiasts, who see MPAs as an all-embracing solution for overfishing and all the other ills of the marine environment".

  6. #56
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    http://www.fishnewseu.com/44-latest-...n-concern.html

    MPAC’s consultation concern

    THE MPA Fishing Coalition (MPAC) has voiced its concerns about the manner in which management measures are implemented in marine conservation zones, and is keen to ensure that fishermen are duly consulted.

    MPAC Chairman, Dr Stephen Lockwood, said: "All the best-practice models available suggest that in order to obtain protection for vulnerable features, whilst at the same time minimising the conflict of MCZs with fishing businesses and communities, it is necessary for regulators to engage closely with fishermen at site level. It is in these vital discussions that adjustments and adaptations can be found to achieve conservation objectives without displacing fishermen from their customary fishing grounds.

    "A consensus approach offers the best way of securing fishermen's support and involvement in securing conservation goals. Following our recent meeting with Defra when we discussed the timetable for designating MCZs in English waters, our fear is that when push comes to shove, this vital engagement will be lost in a rushed process."

    "We welcome the Government's commitment to a rational, evidence-based and phased approach, to designation of marine sites. This is the only way we can be assured that the features and site boundaries are in the right locations.

    "But once designations are made, experience suggests that there will be intense pressures from some quarters to implement management measures straight away and the local-level discussions will be pushed aside. The experience of the European marine sites is fresh in our minds. The threat of legal challenged by one NGO was enough to press the fast-forward button. It is far from inconceivable that once formal designation of all three tranches of MCZs in English waters is made, these kinds of pressures will re-emerge. In addition to a vocal NGO community, geared up to push for immediate implementation measures, there are a number of international obligations like OSPAR and EU legislative requirements that will set up irresistible pressures on the ministers of the day."

    "All this if fine if all you want is a tick-box exercise so that you can move on to the next environmental target and claim the credit. But if you want a lasting, equitable and effective outcome, time for discussion is required.

    "It is our belief and contention that formal designation should be withheld until after decisions have been reached on suitable management measures for each site. And those decisions should only take place after proper meaningful talks with the fishermen who will potentially be affected. Calm discussions will deliver the best outcomes but our fear is that the designation process is set up in a way that will exactly preclude this."

    Dr Lockwood said that MPAC has also identified two other areas of concern in its discussions with Defra. At present there does not appear to be a clear coordination of site designations across devolved administrations or with bordering states. A lack of adequate, and transparent, coordination could result in unnecessary duplication of sites necessary to meet statutory and international obligations. In addition, despite numerous promises to undertake a review of possible effort displacement from MCZ, no such review has been produced. MPAC is worried that not only could displacement jeopardise livelihoods in marginal areas but could exacerbate stock management problems associated with forthcoming no-discard measures.

  7. #57
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    Very VERY "convenient" to find this just after the area being turned down,I'd bet a pound to a penny this was taken from a beach a lot further west in a bucket of water and planted to "be found", Davie

    Cushion starfish found for first time in Kimmeridge

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-dorset-26966995


    The starfish has five equal length arms and is about 40mm in diameter

    A type of starfish has been discovered living in a rock pool at Kimmeridge Bay, Dorset, for the first time.

    The tiny creature was found during a low tide beach exploration by Dorset Wildlife Trust.

    Julie Hatcher, of the trust, said: "This delicate cushion starfish has never been recorded this far east in the UK."

    Native to Portugal and the Mediterranean, it uses tiny feet to glide across the seabed.

    The starfish has five equal length arms and is about 40mm in diameter.

    Numbers are predicted to rise due to climate change.

    In November the site between Broadbench to Kimmeridge Bay failed to make the government's list of Marine Conservation Zones (MCZ).

    In January rare barnacle species were found among Dorset storm debris at Chesil Beach.

    According to the trust, it was the first time the crustaceans, which are native to North America, the Caribbean and the Gulf of Mexico, had been recorded on land in the UK.

  8. #58
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    http://www.iwcp.co.uk/news/news/mari...6216.aspx?mn=2

    Marine conservation meeting with minister


    A map showing the possible sites for Marine Conservation Zones (MCZs) around the Isle of Wight.

    A GOVERNMENT minister is to visit the Isle of Wight to hear the views of Islanders on Marine Conservation Zones (MCZs).

    Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs fisheries minister George Eustice met with Isle of Wight MP Andrew Turner yesterday (Wednesday) and has now agreed to visit the Island to discuss the latest proposed possible MCZ candidates, which include six sites around the Island.

    Mr Turner said: "It is important to note that these are only candidate sites — even DEFRA do not necessarily expect all of them will go forward. Unlike on the mainland, these proposals potentially affect every single Island resident as we all need to cross the Solent, and a great many Islanders rely on the sea to earn their living or for recreational purposes.

    "It is in everyone’s interests that the marine environment is properly protected and the need to take account of the social and economic impact of these zones is enshrined in legislation, so the secret to taking this forward successfully will be in getting the balance right."

    Mr Eustice said: "I look forward to continuing my discussions with Andrew later this year and to listening to local communities’ views about protecting the marine environment around the Isle of Wight."

    A date for the meeting has yet to be arranged.

    The possible Isle of Wight sites are:

    • Norris, East Cowes, to Ryde

    • The Needles

    • Yarmouth to Cowes

    • Utopia, to the east of the Island

    • Bembridge

    • Offshore Overfalls, to the south east of the Island

    Do they want ANY inshore fishing industry or not? if this goes ahead then no fishing around the Isle of White so NO industry, total and utter madness being forced through by City dwelling idiots who have absolutely NO CLUE about the grounds / conditions and the damage THEY are doing to the fishing industry, Davie

  9. #59
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    Government accused of dithering over marine protection zones

    http://www.fishupdate.com/news/fulls...ion_zones.html



    A GROUP of MPs has accused Government of dragging its feet over implementing marine conservation zones around the UK coast.

    Legislation passed in 2009 allowed for the creation of 127 zones, a plan which was strongly opposed by most British fishing organisations.

    The industry says while it supports the principle of protection zones the current list has been drawn up without proper planning and consultation, and has argued that 127 is far too many.

    So far the government has designated 27 conservation area which include a ban on fishing in some instances and a further 37 zones could come into being by the end of next year.

    But now the Parliamentary the Environmental Audit Committee has said there is a ‘lack of government commitment’ on the issue.

    However, the government has hit back by saying it was doing ‘more than ever’ to protect marine habitats.

    Marine conservation zones have been set up to conserve ‘nationally rare’ or ‘threatened’ habitats and wildlife in inshore waters, as well as in offshore seas around England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

    However, the report called on ministers to move more quickly and to establish more protected areas of the seas.

    ‘This slow pace has been disappointing and suggests a lack of government commitment to this initiative’, the parliamentary committee said in the report.

    The committee's chairwoman, Joan Walley, said the zones could ‘protect our seas from over-fishing and give species and habitats space to recover.

    She said the government had been ‘too slow in creating these zones and it has failed to get coastal communities and fishermen on board.

    ‘It is now well over four years since the launch of the programme, yet only 27 of the 127 sites recommended by independent project groups have been designated.

    ‘The government must stop trying to water down its pledge to protect our seas and move much more quickly to establish further protection zones and ensure they can be enforced.’

    She added: ‘When a rare species or biodiverse stretch of seabed is destroyed, it may be lost forever.’

    Defra said: ‘We are doing more than ever to protect our marine environment, with 27 MCZs designated last year and a further two more phases of designation expected over the next few years.

    ‘Management measures are currently being drawn up to ensure effective, tailored protection for each of the sites.’

  10. #60
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    Judicial review in Devonport dredge dump row

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-cornwall-27945388

    Campaigners fighting the dumping of dredged material from Devonport near a Marine Conservation Zone (MCZ) off Cornwall say their case is being taken to a judicial review.

    Marine life in the area is the most protected in Europe, they say, but legal protections are being ignored.

    The campaign has been ongoing for years.

    Waste dredged in Devonport Dockyard is deposited near Rame Head in southeast Cornwall.

    The practice, approved by the Marine Management Organisation, allows larger ships to access the harbour.

    Phil Hutty, Liberal Democrat prospective parliamentary candidate for south east Cornwall, said: "We're very grateful we now have the support of the environmental law foundation and our solicitors, who have asked to take on our case for judicial review."

    In a judicial review, High Court judges examine whether public authorities are acting within their legal powers.

    They can order authorities to cease unlawful activities and can award damages.

    The Marine Management Organisation, which regulates the marine industry, confirmed the campaigners have applied for a judicial review.

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