Trident families receive report - Page 7
Page 7 of 7 FirstFirst ... 567
Results 61 to 67 of 67

Thread: Trident families receive report

  1. #61
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Fraserburgh , Scotland
    Posts
    16,038

    Default 'No blame' for loss of fishing boat Trident in 1974

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotlan...tland-12565786

    No-one was to blame for the sinking of a trawler which sank in 1974 with the loss of seven lives, a report has said.

    The Peterhead boat Trident sank off Caithness, and relatives have since expressed concerns about stability.

    Sir Stephen Young said in his findings the loss of the Trident was not caused or contributed to by any wrongful act by anyone.

    A reopened inquiry into the loss of the trawler got under way in Aberdeen in 2009.

    The sheriff principal of Grampian, Highlands and Islands, in his report into the sinking, agreed with the findings of an expert panel that the Trident had specific sea-keeping characteristics that resulted in a measurable and significant probability of capsize in the prevailing weather conditions at the time.

    He said a loose trawl net may have contributed to the vessel's instability but no-one was to blame for the loss of the Trident.

    The families of the men who died will officially receive the findings later.

    http://www.fv-trident.org.uk/trident...n%20Report.pdf

  2. #62

    Default

    Seems that what they are saying is that the vessel was fine apart from having unspecified "specific sea-keeping characteristics" that made her different from other, very similar, 80’ vessels, no-one is to blame, the weather wasn’t bad, she just capsized in the prevailing weather conditions on 3 October 1974 and seven lives were lost……

    Our sympathies are with the families who have fought long and hard to find out what happened on that day in 1974.

    http://the-trawler-gaul.blogspot.com...rt-part-1.html

    Regards,

    Ronda

  3. #63
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Fraserburgh , Scotland
    Posts
    16,038

    Default

    whitewash is the only word I have for this Ronda , she was not stable from the day she was delivered to the day she was lost. If she had been stable , had the design been stable , then why was her sistership the Silver Lining banned from going to sea until she had been lengthened by over 11ft and a lot more ballast put in her.

    Given they admit that she had stability "issues" then the reports conclusions do not make sense except to try and keep the MCA out of court for allowing her to sail from the yard without having her stability checked.

    I don't know if Aberdeen was unusual but the DTi there didn't let you off with anything , when you had your stability checked the boat was swung using a rope onto the mast to check how long she took to right herself something that I can never ever remember seeing done anywhere else , was this common place in Peterhead/Fraserburgh guys because I'm sure I'd remember if I'd ever seen it done outside Aberdeen.

  4. #64
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Fraserburgh , Scotland
    Posts
    16,038

    Default Relatives brand latest Trident inquiry ‘a waste of money’

    http://www.pressandjournal.co.uk/Article.aspx/2152456

    ‘appears to be an unwillingness, after millions spent, to come out with the truth’

    By Stephen Christie

    Published: 25/02/2011

    The multimillion-pound inquiry into one of Scotland’s worst fishing disasters was branded a “waste of money” last night by relatives of the men who died.

    Sheriff Principal Sir Stephen Young ruled that no one was to blame for the sinking of the Trident nearly 40 years ago.

    He agreed with the findings of experts, who said the most likely probable cause of the tragedy was a sudden and catastrophic capsize.

    All seven crew on board the Peterhead-registered boat were lost when she sank off the coast of Caithness in 1974. Six were from the trawler’s home port and the other was from Portknockie, Moray.

    A new report on the sinking published yesterday was the result of 56 days of evidence heard at Aberdeen town house as part of a reopened probe into the sinking.

    The fresh inquiry, run by the Department for Transport, cost taxpayers more than £6million.
    anticlimax

    Jeannie Ritchie, whose husband and father were on Trident when she sank, labelled Sir Stephen’s 53-page report an “anticlimax”.

    Speaking for the families of the six Peterhead men who died, she said: “There is absolutely nothing conclusive in this and here we are nigh on four decades after the Trident sank without closure. The new inquiry has been a huge anticlimax and a complete waste of public money.”

    Mrs Ritchie, 70, of Arbuthnot Terrace, Peterhead, has always blamed the sinking on Trident’s instability and said it was “disappointing” that this had not been proven.

    Instead, Sir Stephen ruled there was no blame to lay for the loss of the vessel. He agreed with the findings of a joint panel of experts, who said the vessel had most probably capsized suddenly and catastrophically. Sir Stephen added that it was possible a loose net may have been washed to Trident’s starboard side and blocked openings, possibly impacting on the vessel’s stability.

    He said: “Plainly, it must remain a matter for speculation whether these events did occur and, if they did, precisely what effect they would have had on the stability of the Trident at the time of her loss.

    “But I do consider that a loss of stability attributable to a combination of water being trapped on deck and the movement of the large net is one possibility that has not been eliminated by the evidence led at the reopened formal investigation.”

    The report also said Trident did not comply fully with Intergovernmental Maritime Consultative Organisation (Imco) criteria at the time. Sir Stephen said he had discounted this as a cause of the boat’s loss, however.

    He also recommended that UK authorities consider introducing a minimum angle of vanishing stability – the angle from the vertical at which a boat will no longer stay upright but will capsize – for new fishing vessels. He said this should be set at 60 degrees at least.

    Mrs Ritchie said she and the other families would study the report closely before deciding what to do next. She added: “We’re totally dissatisfied with what the sheriff principal has taken from this lengthy inquiry.

    “There appears to be an unwillingness, after millions of pounds spent, to come out with the truth once again.”

    Geoffrey Mitchell QC, who represented the family of Portknockie victim Alexander Mair during the inquiry, said his clients were satisfied with the report. He added: “They haven’t yet had a chance to study the sheriff principal’s report in full but they have been made aware of the main points and are pleased no person has been blamed for the tragedy. They have always been of the view there was an unfortunate combination of events that caused the vessel to sink.”

    Peterhead men Robert Cordiner, 36, Tom Thain, 32, Alex Ritchie, 35, George Nicol, 58, James Tait, 32, and Alex Summers, 35, died alongside Mr Mair, 30.

    They were steaming for Trident’s home port on October3, 1974 when tragedy struck.

    Their bodies were never recovered.

  5. #65
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Fraserburgh , Scotland
    Posts
    16,038

    Default

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotlan...medium=twitter

    Trident relatives visit site of sinking for first time

    Relatives of fishermen who died when their trawler sank in 1974 have made an emotional visit to the site for the first time.

    The Peterhead boat Trident sank off Caithness with the loss of seven lives.

    Jeannie Ritchie, who lost her husband and father, said it was a sad but important journey.

    The visit followed a report in February which concluded no-one was to blame. Relatives want the Trident raised as they claim it was unstable.

    Relatives made the 16-mile journey on Wick lifeboat to the spot where the wreck lay 200ft below them.

    Mrs Ritchie, 71, told BBC Scotland: "We have never had the opportunity to put flowers on a grave.

    "It was very sad but I am glad we had the opportunity to do it."

    She said they would continue to challenge why the men died in the sinking.

    Mrs Ritchie said: "I could visualise all the men. It has given me power to push forward.

    "We are going to continue our fight for these men to prove they died on an unstable boat."
    Loose net

    Radio contact was lost in the afternoon of 3 October, 1974.

    An oil film was reported on 6 October in the area of the last known position of the Trident.

    Robert Cordiner, Alexander Ritchie, George Nicol, James Tait, Thomas Thain, Alexander Mair and Alexander Summers were lost.

    Six of the crew were in their 30s, and Mr Nicol was in his 50s.

    The wreck was discovered by amateur divers several years ago.

    Sir Stephen Young, sheriff principal of Grampian, Highlands and Islands, earlier said in his findings following an inquiry that the loss of the Trident was not caused, or contributed to, by any wrongful act.

    He said a loose trawl net may have contributed to the vessel's instability but no-one was to blame for the loss of the Trident.

  6. #66
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Fraserburgh , Scotland
    Posts
    16,038

    Default

    Widow asking Alex Salmond about Trident sinking review

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotlan...tland-15475438

    A woman widowed when a trawler sank in 1974 is to ask First Minister Alex Salmond for his support for a judicial review.

    The Peterhead boat Trident sank off Caithness with the loss of seven lives.

    An inquiry found no one person could be blamed, but relatives believe stability issues caused the vessel to sink.

    Jeannie Ritchie, who lost her husband and father, is to meet Mr Salmond at the Scottish Parliament on Thursday afternoon.

    Radio contact with the Trident was lost on 3 October, 1974.

    A film of oil was reported on 6 October, in the area of the last known position of the boat.

    Robert Cordiner, Alexander Ritchie, George Nicol, James Tait, Thomas Thain, Alexander Mair and Alexander Summers died.

    Six of the crew were in their 30s. Mr Nicol was in his 50s.

    The wreck was found by amateur divers several years ago.

    Sir Stephen Young, sheriff principal of Grampian, Highlands and Islands, earlier said in his findings, following an inquiry, that the loss of the Trident was not caused, or contributed to, by any wrongful act.

    He said a loose trawl net may have contributed to the vessel's instability but no-one was to blame for the loss of the Trident.

  7. #67
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Fraserburgh , Scotland
    Posts
    16,038

    Default

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotlan...tland-16509472

    Some Trident widows take judicial review bid to Europe

    Some relatives of men lost when a trawler sank in 1974 are to take their fight for a judicial review into the tragedy to Europe.

    The Peterhead boat Trident sank off Caithness with the loss of seven lives.

    An inquiry found no one person could be blamed, but some relatives believe stability issues caused the vessel to sink.

    A bid for legal aid for the review was earlier turned down, then an appeal against that was also refused.

    A reopened inquiry into the loss of the trawler got under way in Aberdeen in 2009.

    Sir Stephen Young said in his findings last year that the loss of the Trident was not caused or contributed to by any wrongful act.

    Sir Stephen, sheriff principal of Grampian, Highlands and Islands, agreed in his report into the sinking, with the findings of an expert panel, that the Trident had specific sea-keeping characteristics that resulted in a measurable and significant probability of capsize in the prevailing weather conditions at the time.
    Found by divers

    He said a loose trawl net may have contributed to the vessel's instability, but that no-one was to blame for the loss of the Trident.

    Radio contact was lost in the afternoon of 3 October, 1974.

    An oil film was reported on 6 October, in the area of the last known position of the Trident.

    Robert Cordiner, Alexander Ritchie, George Nicol, James Tait, Thomas Thain, Alexander Mair and Alexander Summers were lost.

    Six of the crew were in their 30s, and Mr Nicol was in his 50s.

    The wreck was discovered by amateur divers several years ago.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •