Days at sea / CFP / Quota talks - Page 4
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Thread: Days at sea / CFP / Quota talks

  1. #31
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    Default Nephrops market is still depressed

    http://www.fishnewseu.com/latest-new...depressed.html

    Quote Originally Posted by fishnewseu
    Friday, 17 April 2009 13:11

    ONE Norwegian landing of blue whiting into Peterhead this week was in the main rejected with only around 20 tonnes accepted for processing for human consumption from about 700 tonnes on offer.

    Meanwhile, despite the Channel blockade this week, Fraserburgh was not hit with an upsurge of withdrawals of hake and megrim for example with monks said to be selling reasonably well.

    At Peterhead, there was concern that some good quality hake was withdrawn this week, but this was said to be only a small amount with megrim landings at Peterhead yesterday and today selling.

    Nephrops landings into Fraserburgh this week were relatively quiet with all catches selling in what is still being described as an indifferent nephrops market.

    Some "colossal" prices for whiting and haddock were reported from North-east Scotland this week but cod levels were described as "miserable," the finger of blame still being pointed at Humber imports.

    On the West Coast, the nephrops market remains unchanged with no further drop in price. Again the market is described as lack-lustre.

  2. #32
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    Default Regional Management 'key To Reform Of Fisheries Policy'

    http://www.fishupdate.com/news/fulls...S_POLICY_.html

    Quote Originally Posted by fishupdate
    Speaking ahead of tomorrow's (Tuesday) publication of the European Commission’s proposals to reform the Common Fisheries Policy (CFP), Liberal Democrat Fisheries spokesman Liam McArthur MSP said: 'When I met with the European Fisheries Commissioner last year he assured me that any reform of the CFP would include further moves towards regional management of our fisheries.

    'Liberal Democrats have long argued that this would be beneficial to the Scottish fleet and the communities it supports. It would give greater protection to fish stocks by allowing local conditions to be considered when quotas are decided.'
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  3. #33
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    Default SFF calls for measures to protect Scottish fleet

    http://www.fishupdate.com/news/fulls...ish_fleet.html

    Quote Originally Posted by fishupdate
    On the eve of the formal publication by the European Commission of its proposals for the reform of the Common Fisheries Policy (CFP), the Scottish Fishermen’s Federation says it is crucial that meaningful measures are put forward that will safeguard the future of the Scottish fishing industry and ensure greater regional control.

    The EC will be publishing its proposals in a Green Paper tomorrow.

    Bertie Armstrong, SFF chief executive, said: 'eform is very necessary indeed - by anyone's standards the CFP has failed. It is of paramount importance that the forthcoming debate is focused on practical, meaningful reform and not solely on expressions of rejection of the current policy.

    It is essential that the final outcome ensures that there is an efficient framework of properly managing the access of European fleets to a limited and shared resource - fish do no not recognise national boundaries.

    The mechanisms of the CFP are far too centralised, in a top-down, one-size-fits-all regime. This takes little account of regional differences and the starkly different approaches taken by individual member states to responsible fishing. For the Scottish fishing industry, two examples of our strong efforts include the dramatic decommissioning schemes of 2001 and 2003 to ensure the fleet is at the right size to ensure sustainable fishing, and our leadership in cod mortality reduction measures. Both of these initiatives merit practical recognition when forming and developing the new regulations.

    For the Scottish fleet, the outcome must protect for the future our historically proven share of the fish in our waters. There must be no move away from the principle of ‘relative stability’, which presently ensures this. We have worked hard and made sacrifices to protect the stocks and will continue to do so. There must be a transfer of powers and responsibilities from Brussels to the regions, to member states and to the fishing industry. We look forward to playing our important part in shaping the future of fisheries policy in Europe.'
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  4. #34
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    Default EU commission urges fishing cuts

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/8008939.stm

    Quote Originally Posted by BBC
    By Richard Black
    Environment correspondent, BBC News website

    Protesting fishermen with EU flag
    Fishermen routinely blame the EU for falling stocks

    The EU has far too many fishing boats, and major cuts are needed to make fishing sustainable, according to the European Commission.

    The commission's green paper on Common Fisheries Policy (CFP) reform also says fishermen should be given more responsibility for managing stocks.

    A copy obtained by BBC News prior to publication on Wednesday says 30% of EU fish stocks are beyond safe limits.

    It says member states "micro-manage" decisions for political reasons.

    Despite major reforms in 2002, it concludes, the reality for EU fish and fishermen consists of "overfishing, fleet overcapacity, heavy subsidies, low economic resilience and decline in the volume of fish caught".

    Eighty-eight percent of EU stocks are fished beyond their maximum sustainable yield - the highest catch that can be maintained over an indefinite period - and for some, such as North Sea cod, the vast majority of fish are caught before they have reproduced.

    Fishermen would end up richer, the commission concludes, by reducing catches until depleted stocked recover - but the system is set up to ensure short-term profits are the driving factor.

    Blame game

    Many aspects of the commission's analysis agree with the positions that environmental groups have taken down the years.

    We believe this proposal recognises the improved record of fishermen in terms of environmental responsibility in recent years
    John Rutherford, SeaFish
    Blog: Commission hits back of net

    "Irrespective of any reform, a number of fishing fleets are two-three times the size needed to catch the available fish," said Uta Bellion, director of the Pew Environment Group's EU marine programme.

    "Only by balancing fleet capacity with fishing opportunity can we secure a CFP that provides long-term socio-economic benefits."

    Across the EU, fleet capacity has come down, the commission says, but only about 2-3% per year. Meanwhile, technological improvements are making boats 2-3% more efficient every year - so the capacity reductions are having little effect.

    The commission's scientifically derived proposals on sustainable catch levels are routinely revised upwards when EU environment ministers meet, traditionally in late December, to set quotas for the year following.

    Although fishermens' groups often blame the commission for quotas they consider too low, the green paper argues that many member states have been guilty of seeking to maintain high quotas on depleted stocks for political reasons.

    Falling stocks mean lower catches, and what the document describes as "a vicious circle of overfishing, overcapacity and low economic resilience (resulting in) high political pressure to increase short-term fishing opportunities at the expense of future sustainability of the industry".
    Fisherman with box of mackerel
    The Commission is keen on having fishermen "own" rights to catch

    Without naming names, the paper's wording makes it clear that the commission thinks some countries have a much better track record on this point than others.

    The green paper recognises that achieving sustainable catch levels means working with fishermen, encouraging them to develop their own methods of sustainable management and creating incentives that promote a long-term perspective.

    One option raised is expanding the use of transferable quotas, where fishermen "own" the right to fish for many years, so gaining from managing the stock sustainably.

    SeaFish, the UK's government-supported industry body, broadly welcomed the green paper.

    "We are glad the commission recognises the fundamental issues that need to be tackled, in particular the urgent need for a solution to discards and the need for a level playing field across all member states," said the organisation's chief executive John Rutherford.

    "We welcome... the opportunity it offers fishermen to become involved in the responsible management of fish stocks. We believe this proposal recognises the improved record of fishermen in terms of environmental responsibility in recent years."

    Among the commission's other ideas are:

    * removing all remaining subsidies, such as cheap fuel
    * increasing the effectiveness of inspections and penalties for rule-breaking
    * differentiating between the rights of small-scale community-based coastal fishing boats and large industrial concerns

    The commission is asking for comments and ideas on its green paper, and aims to bring a reformed CFP into existence by 2013.

    Richard.Black-INTERNET@bbc.co.uk

  5. #35
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    Default Fishermen 'to resist fleet cuts'

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/scotland/...st/8008603.stm

    Quote Originally Posted by BBC
    Fishing industry leaders have vowed to resist any attempt to reduce the Scottish fleet.

    The European Commission is publishing plans to reform the Common Fisheries Policy (CFP).

    The commission launched the review on the grounds the current regime failed to protect stocks, and fishermen who obey the rules can still be penalised.

    The Scottish Fishermen's Federation (SFF) said it believed the Scottish fleet was the right size.

    The draft proposals from the commission highlight there are too many boats fishing in European waters. It is claimed this is at the root of all problems for the industry, and must be addressed in CFP reforms.


    We have worked hard and made sacrifices to protect the stocks and will continue to do so
    Bertie Armstrong
    Scottish Fishermen's Federation chief executive

    The SFF has called for safeguards for the Scottish industry, and more regional control.

    SFF chief executive Bertie Armstrong said: "Reform is very necessary indeed - by anyone's standards the CFP has failed.

    "It is of paramount importance that the forthcoming debate is focused on practical, meaningful reform and not solely on expressions of rejection of the current policy.

    "It is essential that the final outcome ensures that there is an efficient framework of properly managing the access of European fleets to a limited and shared resource - fish do not recognise national boundaries."

    'Important part'

    He explained: "The mechanisms of the CFP are far too centralised, in a top-down, one-size-fits-all regime. This takes little account of regional differences and the starkly different approaches taken by individual member states to responsible fishing.

    "For the Scottish fleet, the outcome must protect the future our historically proven share of the fish in our waters.

    "We have worked hard and made sacrifices to protect the stocks and will continue to do so. We look forward to playing our important part in shaping the future of fisheries policy in Europe."

    Environment group WWF Scotland said the recovery of stocks must be at the top of the agenda of reform.

  6. #36
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    Default Return powers to fishing nations, says SNP MEP

    http://www.fishupdate.com/news/fulls...s_SNP_MEP.html

    Quote Originally Posted by fishupdate
    SNP President Ian Hudghton MEP yesterday (Tuesday) called for the return of fisheries management powers to Europe's fishing nations and an ending of the EU's central role in fisheries decision making.

    The call comes on the day the European Commission is expected to approve a paper aimed at kick-starting the debate on the future of the Common Fisheries Policy. Mr Hudghton’s call was supported by SNP colleagues in the Scottish and UK parliaments.

    The Commission is expected to acknowledge that the CFP has failed to deliver a sustainable fishing industry and is calling for every aspect of fisheries policy to be reviewed.

    Ian Hudghton MEP commented: 'I welcome the fact that the Commission has finally acknowledged that the CFP has been an unmitigated disaster. In its quarter-century history, we have seen once proud fishing communities fall into decline while key decisions on stock management are taken in late night meetings in Brussels.

    'The Commission has stated that no aspect of the CFP should go untouched in the discussions on fisheries reform. I agree and believe that the fiction that centralised control of fishing is a fundamental part of the EU must be shown for what it is.

    'The problems with the CFP began when historic rights were taken away from Europe's coastal nations and powers were transferred to the centre. It is now time to reverse that process and return these powers to individual nations working in cooperation on a regional basis.

    'A well managed fishing industry should and does have a bright and sustainable future. Scotland continues to have some of the best fisheries resources in Europe and the management of those resources should be brought closer to Scotland's fishing communities.

    'In the 1970s, the Conservative government said that the fishing industry was 'expendable'. In subsequent decades successive Labour and Tory governments concurred with this view by signing us up to the CFP. This wholesale review of European fisheries finally gives us the opportunity to redress the balance - and return the powers to where it matters.

    SNP Westminster Fisheries spokesman, Angus MacNeil MP, said: 'The CFP has been a disaster for Scotland and I am glad that the Commission have recognised some of the problems that the SNP has been highlighting for years.

    'It is a farce that 27 member states, many of which are landlocked, micromanage our vital fisheries from Brussels. It is vital to return control over the sector to ensure a sustainable future for the industry and our coastal communities.

    'Successive Labour and Tory government failure to stand up for our fishing industry in Europe has been a disgrace. Since 2007 the Scottish government has made a huge and positive difference to the fishing industry. Richard Lochhead and his SNP colleagues take every opportunity to stand up for Scotland's vital fishing interests but they can only do so much whilst fishing policy remains largely in the control of Brussels and London.

    'The CFP has failed to protect either our coastal communities or the marine environment. If we look to the north of Scotland many of our European neighbours operate successfully outside its scope. Our fishing communities deserve better.

    'This root and branch review is an important opportunity to build a sound management policy and sustainable future for fishing. I hope that everyone will take the opportunity to take part in this debate."

    SNP MSP for the Highlands and Islands David Thompson welcomed the new approach to fisheries under the SNP government. 'In the past two years the Scottish government has shown we have what it takes to make a positive difference with real achievements for Scotland’s fishing communities. It is clear that ending centralised European control over the sector is crucial for the future of the industry and our coastal communities.'

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  7. #37
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    Default Euro MEP slams UK governement over failure to support fishermen

    http://www.fishupdate.com/news/fulls...fishermen.html

    Quote Originally Posted by fishupdate
    The UK government has been slammed by a Euro MP for failing to support British fishermen in the wake of a promise by the French fisheries minister to provide financial aid and increased quotas for protesting French fishermen.

    Speaking in Strasbourg, Scottish MEP Struan Stevenson, who is fisheries spokesman for the Conservatives in the European parliament, said: 'We have seen the French and other governments subsidise their fishing industry before. Although we fish in the same waters as the French, the UK government refuses to help our fishermen, be it on rising fuel prices last summer or annual fishing quotas.

    But every time the French fishermen blockade the Channel ports, the French government caves in to their demands, while we obey the law and as a result get nothing. It is frustrating and deeply unfair.

    'We've seen more than 60 per cent of our whitefish fleet scrapped in the last six years because of the catastrophic impact of the Common Fisheries Policy. The horrendous mish-mash of total allowable catches, quotas, restrictions on the days that a fishermen can go to sea, technical restrictions on the gear he can use, limits on his engine size and a plethora of micro-managed rules and regulations dreamed up by Brussels bureaucrats, has driven our fishermen to the verge of bankruptcy. It is time the British government stood up for our industry in the same way the French government stands up for theirs.

    'Although the European Commission is currently examining the French government's promise of £3.5 million financial aid to fishermen and a renegotiation of France's fishing quotas, which the French minister Michael Barnier promised last week, it seems likely that it will be approved. The aid package would cover losses suffered by French fishermen who are facing a temporary halt to fishing, by boats nearing the limits of their quotas. The European Commission has confirmed that some aid may be justified from the European Fisheries Fund. In addition, although quotas agreed by the Council of Minister last December cannot be re-negotiated, Michel Barnier has promised to get extra quotas from other EU Member States who will swap unused quota with France. In other words he is prepared to go the extra mile to help his fisheries sector.

    'I am really angry about this. I was in Shetland, Orkney and Stornoway last week talking to Scottish fishermen who are at the end of their tether because of the appalling quota regime agreed last December. But now they see their French counterparts rewarded for blockading the ports of Calais, Boulogne and Dunkirk in the Channel last week. The French fishermen's action cost millions to ferry operators, businesses and massive disruption to travellers but nevertheless has won them a promise of cash and extra quotas. Meanwhile the British government refuses to budge and does nothing to help our beleaguered fishermen. It is outrageous.'

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  8. #38
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    Default UK welcomes Fishing Policy reform proposals

    http://www.fishupdate.com/news/fulls...proposals.html

    Quote Originally Posted by fishupdate
    UK fisheries minister Huw Irranca-Davies has welcomed far-reaching proposals for the future of European fisheries.

    The European Commission today published its thoughts on reform of the European Union's Common Fisheries Policy (CFP) to achieve more sustainable management of fish stocks. These are due to be discussed by Fisheries Ministers this week.


    Huw Irranca-Davies said: 'The case for radical reform is undeniable. I want the UK to play a leading role in making it happen.

    'We want ambitious reform that integrates fisheries management with that of the wider marine environment. We need a reformed CFP to focus more effectively on achieving sustainable fisheries and to devolve appropriate powers and responsibilities. We need more emphasis on long-term planning supported by robust science.

    'We also need to tackle the waste of dead fish being thrown back in the sea and to enable fishermen to land more fish whilst catching less.'

  9. #39
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    Default EU fisheries proposals may bring calmer waters for UK fishermen

    http://www.fishupdate.com/news/fulls...fishermen.html

    Quote Originally Posted by fishupdate
    Today's publication of the European Commission's Green Paper on the future of the Common Fisheries Policy (CFP) provides a long-awaited opportunity for a radical overhaul of a management regime that has had a ruinous impact on UK fisheries, Struan Stevenson MEP, Conservative fisheries spokesman in the European Parliament, said today.

    Mr Stevenson says that under the CFP our fishermen have seen 60% of the UK whitefish fleet scrapped and thousands of jobs destroyed, despite the fact that the core objectives of the CFP written into the EU treaty were aimed at preserving and protecting fish stocks and maintaining and enhancing jobs in the fishing industry.

    The Green Paper includes opportunities to devolve fisheries management out of Brussels and down to the stakeholders in the various fishing zones. Mr Stevenson has argued that decisions should be taken out of the hands of Brussels 'desk jockeys' and given to the Regional Advisory Councils (RACs) so that more tailored decisions can be made, in consultation with fishermen rather than through Brussels diktats.

    Mr Stevenson said: 'Fifty years of micro-management from the ivory towers of Brussels has led to shattered fish stocks and broken livelihoods. Quota cuts, TAC (Total Allowable Catch) restrictions, de-commissioning schemes, lay-offs, tie-ups, emergency closures and redundancies have decimated swathes of our fishing fleet.

    'The arrival of the Green Paper and the chance for meaningful consultation with the fisheries sector and the general public will hopefully bring a new era of calmer waters ahead. This paper represents the most dramatic overhaul of fisheries management since the CFP was born and is a clear indication that the commission now accepts that micro-management by Eurocrats in Brussels has failed.

    'This is the last chance saloon for our fishermen. The level of reform needed in the CFP is dramatic.

  10. #40
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    Default EU launches fishing consultation

    http://www.fishupdate.com/news/fulls...sultation.html

    Quote Originally Posted by fishupdate
    Today, the European Commission adopted a Green Paper on the future of the EU's Common Fisheries Policy. The paper analyses the shortcomings of the current Policy and launches a broad public consultation on how these shortcomings should be tackled.

    Fishermen and other interested parties from the sector, but also scientists, civil society and interested citizens, are invited to respond and have their say until December 31 on the future face of European fisheries.

    The consultation is the first step of the process which should bring about a radical reform of the Common Fisheries Policy.

    Commissioner for Maritime Affairs and Fisheries Joe Borg said: 'We are asking questions even on the fundamentals of the current policy and should leave no stone unturned. We are not looking for just another reform. It is time to design a modern, simple and sustainable system for managing fisheries in the EU, which is able to last well into the 21st century.'

    The purpose of the Green Paper adopted today is twofold: raise awareness of the challenges faced by the sector in recent years; and elicit a public response which can grow into a new, innovative and more consensual approach to fisheries regulation. It raises questions such as: How can we ensure the long-term sustainability and the viability of fisheries? How can overall fleet capacity be adapted while addressing the social concerns faced by coastal communities? How can a culture of compliance be further developed? How best can the CFP contribute to fisheries sustainability beyond EU waters?

    The paper analyses all the facets of fisheries policy today and explains why some problems persist despite the progress made since the reform of 2002. One of the main problems is the depleted state of European fish stocks: 88 per cent of stocks are overfished (against a global average of 25 per cent) and 30 per cent are 'outside safe biological limits', i.e. they cannot reproduce at normal rate because the parenting population is too depleted. Yet in many fisheries we keep fishing two or three times more than what fish stocks can sustain. This is mostly as a result of fleet overcapacity. Such overcapacity is in fact economically inefficient because not only does it deplete stocks but it also constantly drives the industry's profits down. Solutions need to be found to restore the worst-off stocks and at the same time guarantee that fish can continue to be a reliable source of revenue for fishermen.

    Above and beyond overcapacity, the paper identifies four other structural shortcomings of the present approach:

    the lack of precise policy objectives, especially with regard to ecological responsibility and integration with general maritime issues;

    a decision-making system that is too centralised and focused on short-term solutions which more often than not undermine long-term sustainability;

    a framework that does not give sufficient responsibility to the industry;

    the absence of political will towards compliance with the fishing limitations.

    These issues have to be considered in a context where Europe imports two-thirds of its demand in fisheries products.

    The Commission is concerned that if a better environmental sustainability of fishing is not achieved in the coming years, the consequence will be impoverished seas and an economically unviable fishing industry. If however the next reform projects the Common Fisheries Policy into the 21st century, the benefits will not just be limited to fishermen or coastal communities, but will also be shared by Europe's citizens.

    Although the Commission is only legally bound to review some parts of the CFP by 2012, the prevailing situation, particularly as regards stocks and fleet overcapacity, has convinced it of the need to launch the reform process already now. The consultation launched today will close on December 31 and the Commission will sum up its results in the first half of 2010. After further consultation with stakeholders, the Commission will then prepare an impact assessment report and develop a proposal for a new basic regulation. This could then be presented to the European parliament and council early in 2011, with a view for adoption in 2012.

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