Coronavirus posts - Page 2
Page 2 of 13 FirstFirst 123412 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 123

Thread: Coronavirus posts

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Fraserburgh , Scotland
    Posts
    17,418

    Default

    Icelandic trawler given Covid-19 clearance

    https://fiskerforum.com/icelandic-tr...-19-clearance/


    Freezer trawler Hrafn Sveinbjarnarson GK-255. Image: Thorfish

    Thorfish factory trawler Hrafn Sveinbjarnarson docked in the Westman Islands this week, with 17 of its 26 crew suffering from illness and three of them were judged to be serious.

    The local police announced that the harbour area had been immediately cordoned off and no chances were taken as health professionals went on board.

    Samples were taken from seven of the crew, and four of the trawler’s crew were taken ashore for observation in a secure unit, while the rest of the crew remained on board at the quayside. Access to Hrafn Sveinbjarnarson was prohibited and the crew were kept kept on board while samples were analysed.

    To their relief, it turned out that the mystery illness that had spread through the crew after their last landing was unpleasant, but the samples confirmed it wasn’t Covid-19 – but a ‘normal’ flu of the kind that tends to make a regular appearance every winter.

    Like other fishing companies in Iceland, Thorfish had already prepared a contingency plan based on guidelines prepared by the Coast Guard in the event of Covid-19 cases occurring on board fishing vessels.

    Measures include isolating the crewman in question in a cabin, with a single other crew member assigned to take meals and other necessities to the affected individual. At the end of such a trip, the affected individual and anyone in contact with him would be required to go into isolation, with a deep-cleaning process to take place on board before returning to sea.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Fraserburgh , Scotland
    Posts
    17,418

    Default

    EU enables Member States to support fisheries sector

    https://fiskerforum.com/eu-enables-m...heries-sector/


    The new Temporary Framework clears the way for state aid up to a €120,000 per undertaking in the fishery and aquaculture sectors

    As the Coronavirus pandemic spreads and continue to present a serious health hazard, many parts of the EU economy are experiencing major disruption. Fishing and aquaculture have been among the hardest hit sectors.

    The European Commission has decided to adopt a temporary State Aid framework to enable Member States to provide relief to economic operators hit by the crisis. The new Temporary Framework allows aid up to a level of €120,000 per undertaking active in the fishery and aquaculture sectors.


    European Commissioner for Environment, Oceans and Fisheries Virginijus Sinkevičius. Image: EU Commission

    ‘Our fishermen and women and our aquaculture farmers are among the first to suffer the economic consequences of Coronavirus, as the demand for seafood has experienced a dramatic slump. But let me say it loud and clear: the European Union stands with you through this crisis. Together, we will ensure that the EU maintains a strong seafood industry and thriving coastal communities, now and in the future,’ said European Commissioner for Environment, Oceans and Fisheries Virginijus Sinkevičius.

    The demand for seafood is experiencing a dramatic downturn, as retailers, restaurants, canteens and other large-scale buyers are reducing or temporarily closing down their activities.

    The seafood industry depends on logistics such as landing facilities, transport and storage, which may also be affected by the evolving crisis.

    The Temporary Framework will enable Member States to make support available, in the form of grants or tax advantages, to operators facing a sudden shortage or unavailability of liquidity. In many cases, this can mean the difference between permanently closing activities and long-term survival of healthy businesses and thousands of jobs.

    Upon notification of the measures by the Member State, the Commission has put in place procedures to enable very swift assessment and decision-making.

    The impact of these measures on coastal areas goes well beyond the fisheries and aquaculture sectors. Also companies in the wider blue economy – from biotech to tourism – will benefit, as worsening economic conditions and restrictions on movement will be felt across the Union over the coming weeks and months.

    Aid can be granted until 31st December 2020 to undertakings that face difficulties as a result of the Coronavirus outbreak.

    These aid measures are fully in line with the EU’s common fisheries policy, which promotes sustainable use of ocean resources. Aid is not applicable to activities explicitly excluded from the de minimis aid in the fishery and aquaculture sector.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Fraserburgh , Scotland
    Posts
    17,418

    Default

    USA : Seafood processors respond to COVID-19 with added precautions

    https://www.thecordovatimes.com/2020...d-precautions/

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Fraserburgh , Scotland
    Posts
    17,418

    Default

    Ireland : Imperative food supply chains are kept intact, says Michael Creed

    https://www.rte.ie/news/coronavirus/...d-coronavirus/

    Response to Coronavirus Epidemic

    http://nffo.org.uk/news/response-to-...-epidemic.html

    Fishermen block Spanish and French boats docking at Dingle pier

    https://www.radiokerry.ie/fishermen-...g-dingle-pier/

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Fraserburgh , Scotland
    Posts
    17,418

    Default

    Covid-19’s huge impact on Australia’s tuna business

    https://fiskerforum.com/covid-19s-hu...tuna-business/


    Tuna Australia’s members have seen their markets collapse as Covid-19 has taken hold. Image: Tuna Australia

    Tuna Australia members have been hit hard by the coronavirus pandemic – and the future doesn’t look promising.

    Within days of the pandemic taking hold, there was a significant economic shock to members’ business operations, threatening their economic viability, reports Kate Bevitt.

    Direct sales to international wholesalers and restaurant chains have ceased as they have stopped buying fish due to low demand, at the same time as the Japanese fresh fish market is depressed due to weak restaurant demand, although wholesale fish prices are related to supply.

    Domestic wholesalers have stopped purchasing fish due to weak demand and buyers have said it is unknown when they will start purchasing again.

    Further problems are due to flights to the US and Japan having limited air freight space, if any at all, while Tuna Australia members do not have access to other Asian markets and obtaining stores to provision fishing vessels has hit obstacles.


    Demand has dropped across all of Tuna Australia’s members’ markets. Image: Tuna Australia

    ‘While government assistance is very welcome in this time of global uncertainty, fundamentally, we need to have a market for our fish,’ said Tuna Australia CEO David Ellis.

    ‘If the government can assist tuna producers by facilitating access to markets, such as subsidised freight using cargo planes, then we are going to be in a better position.’

    According to 4 Seas owner Adam Whan, his business, one of the biggest operators in the Eastern Tuna and Billfish Fishery, has been hit hard by the coronavirus outbreak.

    ‘Our business, which operates five vessels out of Mooloolaba, is primarily export focused. But worldwide demand has dropped. Our export facility processes up to 700-800 tonnes of fish annually and that’s gone to zero. It’s a massive impact. The business has no access to markets right now,’ he said.

    ‘The airlines have dropped out of the skies. There’s no way to get product to the US. And the one airline still flying to Japan will soon be stopping.’

    Typically, from March to October, 4 Seas distributes 30% of its product locally and 70% is exported. During the warmer months, from November to the end of March, the numbers are reversed.

    ‘We can’t dream of catching the same quantity of fish, nor can we simply put it all through the domestic markets. If we push our product into the market, that drives down our prices and that of other seafood operators,’ he said.

    Despite having ‘a few things to turn to,’ Adam said his business is exploring some different options.


    One of 4 Seas’ boats, Straight Shooter. Image: Tuna Australia

    ‘We could go into frozen albacore as that’s still a live market. We’re looking at sea freight. And canneries are an option, as they’re still operating around the world, albeit with 14 days restrictions to enter port.’

    To tread water, Adam said that the industry needs to be able to move product, even at a reduced rate.

    ‘The best thing would be for airline companies to realise that there’s industry demand for flights. Put freight planes back in the air, and if the government subsidised the freight cost then this would alleviate some pain,’ he said, adding that it’s critical that unused quota catch, which will be affected substantially, be carried over.

    ‘We won’t be catching our allowable catches or quota holdings. We’d like to see our unused quota rolled over into 2021 and 2022. That will help us to get rolling when we start back up again.’

    Walker Seafoods owner Heidi Walker said that coronavirus is a ‘real rollercoaster ride’ at the moment.

    ‘With the scale of our business, the number of people we employ and our level of debt, it’s fairly terrifying. We’ve got five boats coming in and nowhere to send the fish,’ she said.

    The Mooloolaba-based business exports 80% of its product to the United States.

    ‘As of Monday, no-one in the US wants our products,’ she explained. ‘We’ve reached out to every customer – some have already closed down, and there are no flights. So even if our customers want our fish, they can’t get it. It’s the same in Sydney and Melbourne. The wholesalers, restaurants and food service industry don’t want our fish.’

    Heidi said that she’d like to see more support from the government and banks to assist with the ‘big issue’ of cashflow.

    ‘We’d like the state government to waive payroll tax for twelve months. I’ve spoken with the banks. I’d like to see them waive interest and principle repayments for a period of time. The big Australian retailers must also play their part in supporting industries like ours,’ she said.

    ‘I’d love them to step up and support products that people can’t move overseas [like tuna] and will be cheaper for consumers.’

    Heidi says Walker Seafoods is exploring new options to navigate these hard times.

    ‘We’re toying with canning tuna but it’s very difficult because Australian labour costs are high,’ she said.
    ‘We’ll push into the local retail market. We’ve spoken with local retailers who have started doing home deliveries. Normal customers are getting home deliveries and doing pick up and go. So we’ll focus more on these stores,’ she said, commenting that it’s critical for the longline tuna industry unite as one to weather this storm.

    ‘We’re all in this together and now is the time to support each other and work out solutions.’
    For Cathal Farrell at Upscale Seafoods, uncertainty is the biggest problem he sees arising from the coronavirus pandemic.

    ‘You can deal with adverse conditions. But uncertainty is very hard to deal with because you don’t know what decision or move to make,’ he said. ‘It’s affecting every facet of our business.’

    Between 70 and 80% of Upscale Seafood’s traditional distribution channels have been shut down.
    Cathal says his business and other operators will need to quickly access new channels like supermarkets, ‘where we traditionally haven’t been very active.’

    ‘We want to see a change in the position of big retailers, who need to help local industries. For example, they could suspend adherence to only purchasing Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) approved products as a temporary measure,’ he suggested.

    Echoing Heidi’s sentiment, Cathal says that industry support will be critical over the coming months and what will help is an industry-wide approach, not a splintered diversified approach.
    ‘As individuals, we wouldn’t know how to start approaching Woollies or Coles or how to get our product in there,’ he said. ‘We need to take an industry approach to get products into supermarkets.’

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Fraserburgh , Scotland
    Posts
    17,418

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Fraserburgh , Scotland
    Posts
    17,418

    Default

    Does UK government aid hit the target?

    https://fiskerforum.com/does-uk-gove...it-the-target/


    UK government aid for those in employment does not apply to self-employment, which includes share fishermen

    As the UK government announced a financial package to alleviate the effects of the Covid-19 epidemic, with the largest proportion set aside for loans to struggling companies, as well as a massive intervention to support those in paid employment, the NFFO points out that there is a clear gap as this support does not reach those in self-employment – including share fishermen.

    ‘That is why an urgent support package shaped to provide meaningful aid to the fishing sector is needed and is being worked on. We expect an announcement shortly,’ and NFFO spokesman commented.

    ‘It will be important that the package keeps those boats at sea, and supply chains operational, where this is an option, and creates the conditions that allows vessels and crews which have had to tie-up to bounce back, as soon as the crisis is over.’

    According to the NFFO’s analysis, some of the measures announced so far will be relevant and significant for the fishing sector.

    ‘Many will not because of the peculiarities of the way our industry is organised. The immediate challenge is therefore to identify the support measures available which can be used and the gaps which will need to be filled by additional tailored interventions.’


    The UK should have access to EU tie-up aid, available through EMFF, according to the NFFO

    Workers in the food industries have been designated as key workers, along with those employed in transport and so exempt from some social distancing requirements, which should help to ensure that supply chains remain operational.

    ‘The fishing industry is itself taking what steps it can to help, within the strictures of a dramatically altered market landscape. Demand for shellfish species like crab and lobster has fallen away so dramatically that the knock-on effects on fishing vessels is immediate. Buyers are, with few exceptions, not buying. There are some early signs of an increase in demand from China but that is a small uptick within an otherwise unrelieved picture of desperation – especially on the back of a winter of storms which prevented most vessels getting to sea – and earning – for several months,’ the NFFO’s spokesman commented.

    ‘The situation with whitefish is more mixed, depending on the specific markets involved, and the steps being taken to maintain fish prices. Producer organisations and market authorities are evening out supply to avoid market gluts as far as possible. This is being done in different ways in different places but overall the aim is to keep the fleets at sea – albeit with a lower level of activity – to maintain supply, keep supply chains operational, people fed, maintain earnings, keep crews intact and businesses viable for when the crisis passes.’

    The closure of pubs, restaurants and supermarket fish counters has a drastic impact on demand.
    At the same time, there is a recognition that social isolation measures have potentially created a significant market for door-step deliveries and there are signs, right around the coast, of fishing boats, markets, producer organisations, and existing supply businesses adapting to these new opportunities.

    The NFFO points out that measures that could be taken include suspending proposed cod recovery measures where it is judged that the drop in demand for fish will directly reduce fishing pressure on cod and act as a substitute for restrictive measures, adapting the EU landing obligation to leap-frog impediments to the efficient operation of fishing vessels, and in particular eliminating the risk that chokes in mixed fisheries could tie up fleets if the quota for a minor species is exhausted, and removing obstacles to securing storage aid for fish withdrawn from the market and temporarily frozen.
    These are also options for accessing EU tie-up aid.

    ‘The UK is no longer formally an EU member state but is continuing to contribute to the EU budget in 2020, so this should be available through the European Maritime and Fisheries Fund,’ the NFFO states.

    ‘The scale and speed of the economic support measures put in place by government are both vital and unprecedented in peacetime. Being very broad-brush the measures announced to date do not amount to an adequate level or form of support that is commensurate with the challenges facing the fishing sector. Work is under way within government and within the fishing industry itself, to fill that gap,’ the NFFO says.

    ‘A jigsaw of measures is appearing. Some pieces have been put in place quickly. Others are still being shaped to fit. It will be some time until the full picture emerges, in these remarkable and challenging times. Urgency is paramount.’

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Fraserburgh , Scotland
    Posts
    17,418

    Default

    Full guidance on staying at home and away from others

    https://www.gov.uk/government/public...ay-from-others

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Fraserburgh , Scotland
    Posts
    17,418

    Default

    Brae factory closes with 22 job losses

    https://www.shetnews.co.uk/2020/03/2...22-job-losses/

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Fraserburgh , Scotland
    Posts
    17,418

    Default

    COVID-19 UPDATE TO CFPO MEMBERS 24/03/20

    https://cfpo.org.uk/latest-news/anno...s-for-members/

    "Today (24 March) we have been in discussion with DEFRA and an announcement is expected within the next 24/48 hours on a package of support that will help self-employed share-fishermen who have been impacted by the coronavirus.

    Although we have little detail we have been assured a proposal has been submitted to the Treasury for decision. Whilst no guarantees are being given, there are high expectations that this new package will fill some of the gaps in the economic support measures announced so far. Clearly, self-employed share-fishermen are not eligible for the support given to wage earners (80% of earnings up to £2500 per month) and so it is imperative that the government acts urgently to fill this gap where needed. The announcement on share fishermen is likely to be part of a package on measures for the self-employed more generally.

    Both directly and through the NFFO we have urged the government to act, as markets fail under the impact of reduced demand. Most export markets, the restaurant & food-service sector, and fish counters in some supermarkets have closed down. Transport links are beginning to be affected.

    The government and industry organisations like the CFPO have a shared goal during this pandemic of keeping businesses in the catching and supply chain intact so that they can thrive again when the crisis is passed.

    Food production workers, including fishermen, have been designated as key workers, acknowledging that food security is a priority and that where possible the links in the supply chain from vessel to consumer should remain intact. Whilst limiting the spread of the virus is paramount and finding ways of limiting risk all-important, people require food.

    We underlined that given the poor start to the year weather-wise many parts of the fleet are entering this crisis with very little resilience/money in the bank, therefore measure must be genuine and include both real money and regulatory considerations and must be developed and delivered urgently.

    We are going to keep in close liaison with NFFO, UKAFPO & other POs and other relevant bodies on an ongoing basis and will endeavour to keep you informed as more information emerges."

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •